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Invasive bacterial diseases in northern Canada.

Degani N, Navarro C, Deeks SL, Lovgren M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Bacterial isolates were forwarded to reference laboratories for confirmation and serotyping.After pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction, crude annual incidence rates of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae decreased from 34.0/100,000 population (1999-2002) to 23.6/100,000 population (2003-2005); substantial reductions were shown among aboriginals.H. influenzae type b was rare; 52% of all H. influenzae cases were caused by type a.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Child Health Evaluative Services Unit, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
International Circumpolar Surveillance (ICS) is a population-based invasive bacterial disease surveillance network. Participating Canadian regions include Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and northern regions of Québec and Labrador (total population 132,956, 59% aboriginal). Clinical and demographic information were collected by using standardized surveillance forms. Bacterial isolates were forwarded to reference laboratories for confirmation and serotyping. After pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction, crude annual incidence rates of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae decreased from 34.0/100,000 population (1999-2002) to 23.6/100,000 population (2003-2005); substantial reductions were shown among aboriginals. However, incidence rates of S. pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and group A streptococci were higher in aboriginal populations than in non-aboriginal populations. H. influenzae type b was rare; 52% of all H. influenzae cases were caused by type a. Data collected by ICS contribute to the understanding of the epidemiology of invasive bacterial diseases among northern populations, which assists in formulation of prevention and control strategies, including immunization recommendations.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Age distribution of surveillance population and cases of infection with group B streptococci (GBS), group A streptococci (GAS), Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the Canadian circumpolar region.
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Figure 1: Age distribution of surveillance population and cases of infection with group B streptococci (GBS), group A streptococci (GAS), Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the Canadian circumpolar region.

Mentions: Infections with S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and GAS were more common in male patients (59.8%, 58.3%, and 62.2%, respectively). Seventy-one percent of all cases of GBS were among female patients; 17.6% (3/17) of cases of GBS were among newborns <1 month of age. All of the newborn cases occurred in the early neonatal period. These 4 organisms disproportionately affect children <2 years of age and persons >65 years of age. Although <4% of the surveillance population was <2 years of age, 21%–67% of the infections occurred within this age group. Similarly, adults >65 years of age had a higher proportion of cases than the surveillance population they represent (Figure).


Invasive bacterial diseases in northern Canada.

Degani N, Navarro C, Deeks SL, Lovgren M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Age distribution of surveillance population and cases of infection with group B streptococci (GBS), group A streptococci (GAS), Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the Canadian circumpolar region.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600163&req=5

Figure 1: Age distribution of surveillance population and cases of infection with group B streptococci (GBS), group A streptococci (GAS), Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the Canadian circumpolar region.
Mentions: Infections with S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and GAS were more common in male patients (59.8%, 58.3%, and 62.2%, respectively). Seventy-one percent of all cases of GBS were among female patients; 17.6% (3/17) of cases of GBS were among newborns <1 month of age. All of the newborn cases occurred in the early neonatal period. These 4 organisms disproportionately affect children <2 years of age and persons >65 years of age. Although <4% of the surveillance population was <2 years of age, 21%–67% of the infections occurred within this age group. Similarly, adults >65 years of age had a higher proportion of cases than the surveillance population they represent (Figure).

Bottom Line: Bacterial isolates were forwarded to reference laboratories for confirmation and serotyping.After pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction, crude annual incidence rates of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae decreased from 34.0/100,000 population (1999-2002) to 23.6/100,000 population (2003-2005); substantial reductions were shown among aboriginals.H. influenzae type b was rare; 52% of all H. influenzae cases were caused by type a.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Child Health Evaluative Services Unit, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
International Circumpolar Surveillance (ICS) is a population-based invasive bacterial disease surveillance network. Participating Canadian regions include Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and northern regions of Québec and Labrador (total population 132,956, 59% aboriginal). Clinical and demographic information were collected by using standardized surveillance forms. Bacterial isolates were forwarded to reference laboratories for confirmation and serotyping. After pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction, crude annual incidence rates of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae decreased from 34.0/100,000 population (1999-2002) to 23.6/100,000 population (2003-2005); substantial reductions were shown among aboriginals. However, incidence rates of S. pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and group A streptococci were higher in aboriginal populations than in non-aboriginal populations. H. influenzae type b was rare; 52% of all H. influenzae cases were caused by type a. Data collected by ICS contribute to the understanding of the epidemiology of invasive bacterial diseases among northern populations, which assists in formulation of prevention and control strategies, including immunization recommendations.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus