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Spatial distribution of Echinococcus multilocularis, Svalbard, Norway.

Fuglei E, Stien A, Yoccoz NG, Ims RA, Eide NE, Prestrud P, Deplazes P, Oksanen A - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: In Svalbard, Norway, the only intermediate host for Echinococcus multilocularis, the sibling vole, has restricted spatial distribution.A survey of feces from the main host, the arctic fox, showed that only the area occupied by the intermediate host is associated with increased risk for human infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Polar Environmental Centre, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway. eva.fuglei@npolar.no

ABSTRACT
In Svalbard, Norway, the only intermediate host for Echinococcus multilocularis, the sibling vole, has restricted spatial distribution. A survey of feces from the main host, the arctic fox, showed that only the area occupied by the intermediate host is associated with increased risk for human infection.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Main study area on the archipelago of Svalbard. Thick solid line, core area for sibling vole; broken line, area of distribution in peak vole year. Inset shows the 4 main settlements on the archipelago of Svalbard.
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Figure 1: Main study area on the archipelago of Svalbard. Thick solid line, core area for sibling vole; broken line, area of distribution in peak vole year. Inset shows the 4 main settlements on the archipelago of Svalbard.

Mentions: Arctic foxes are common throughout Spitsbergen (4); they are most plentiful near seabird cliffs along the coast and less plentiful in the inland valleys (5,6). The only available intermediate host in Svalbard is the sibling vole (Microtus levis, formerly Microtus rossiaemeridionalis). The distribution of sibling voles on the island seems to be limited by availability of plants for food and is at present restricted to the heavily fertilized bird cliffs along the coastline in the Grumant area ([3], Figure). During years when vole densities were high in Grumant, voles may have spread out from the coast toward the east and west (Figure), but they have not yet established permanent populations outside the Grumant area (3). To evaluate how the restricted distribution of the intermediate host affects the spatial distribution of human risk for infection, we sampled fox feces at increasing distances from the core vole range (Grumant) and tested the feces for evidence of E. multilocularis infection by using specific E. multilocularis coproantigen ELISA. We also estimated the density of fox feces in Grumant and next to Longyearbyen by using line transect methods.


Spatial distribution of Echinococcus multilocularis, Svalbard, Norway.

Fuglei E, Stien A, Yoccoz NG, Ims RA, Eide NE, Prestrud P, Deplazes P, Oksanen A - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Main study area on the archipelago of Svalbard. Thick solid line, core area for sibling vole; broken line, area of distribution in peak vole year. Inset shows the 4 main settlements on the archipelago of Svalbard.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600161&req=5

Figure 1: Main study area on the archipelago of Svalbard. Thick solid line, core area for sibling vole; broken line, area of distribution in peak vole year. Inset shows the 4 main settlements on the archipelago of Svalbard.
Mentions: Arctic foxes are common throughout Spitsbergen (4); they are most plentiful near seabird cliffs along the coast and less plentiful in the inland valleys (5,6). The only available intermediate host in Svalbard is the sibling vole (Microtus levis, formerly Microtus rossiaemeridionalis). The distribution of sibling voles on the island seems to be limited by availability of plants for food and is at present restricted to the heavily fertilized bird cliffs along the coastline in the Grumant area ([3], Figure). During years when vole densities were high in Grumant, voles may have spread out from the coast toward the east and west (Figure), but they have not yet established permanent populations outside the Grumant area (3). To evaluate how the restricted distribution of the intermediate host affects the spatial distribution of human risk for infection, we sampled fox feces at increasing distances from the core vole range (Grumant) and tested the feces for evidence of E. multilocularis infection by using specific E. multilocularis coproantigen ELISA. We also estimated the density of fox feces in Grumant and next to Longyearbyen by using line transect methods.

Bottom Line: In Svalbard, Norway, the only intermediate host for Echinococcus multilocularis, the sibling vole, has restricted spatial distribution.A survey of feces from the main host, the arctic fox, showed that only the area occupied by the intermediate host is associated with increased risk for human infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Polar Environmental Centre, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway. eva.fuglei@npolar.no

ABSTRACT
In Svalbard, Norway, the only intermediate host for Echinococcus multilocularis, the sibling vole, has restricted spatial distribution. A survey of feces from the main host, the arctic fox, showed that only the area occupied by the intermediate host is associated with increased risk for human infection.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus