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Hepatitis E in England and Wales.

Lewis HC, Boisson S, Ijaz S, Hewitt K, Ngui SL, Boxall E, Teo CG, Morgan D - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: In 2005, 329 cases of hepatitis E virus infection were confirmed in England and Wales; 33 were confirmed indigenous infections, and a further 67 were estimated to be indigenous infections.Hepatitis E should be considered in the investigation of patients with hepatitis even if they have no history of travel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Emerging Infections and Zoonoses Department, Centre for Infections, Health Protection Agency, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
In 2005, 329 cases of hepatitis E virus infection were confirmed in England and Wales; 33 were confirmed indigenous infections, and a further 67 were estimated to be indigenous infections. Hepatitis E should be considered in the investigation of patients with hepatitis even if they have no history of travel.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Details of cases of acute hepatitis E (HEV) infections, 2005. *Contact with hepatitis E patients who recently returned from hyperendemic countries; †24-year-old woman infected with HEV genotype 1; ‡45-year-old Caucasian man who traveled to Iraq.
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Figure 2: Details of cases of acute hepatitis E (HEV) infections, 2005. *Contact with hepatitis E patients who recently returned from hyperendemic countries; †24-year-old woman infected with HEV genotype 1; ‡45-year-old Caucasian man who traveled to Iraq.

Mentions: The travel history of the 329 patients is summarized in Figure 2. For 102 (31%) patients, pre-illness travel information was recorded on the laboratory request form. Travel status was obtained for 44 additional patients through follow-up, and 33 patients who had not traveled outside the United Kingdom were considered to be indigenous case-patients. Twenty-three (70%) indigenous case-patients were >55 years of age, compared with 26 (24%) of 110 travel-associated case-patients; the median age was 65 years (interquartile range [IQR] 50–74 years) and 41 years (IQR 29–54) (p<0.0001) respectively. Thirty-two of the indigenous case-patients (97%) had Caucasian names (name classification was used as a proxy for ethnicity) compared with 21 (19%) of 110 travelers (p<0.001).


Hepatitis E in England and Wales.

Lewis HC, Boisson S, Ijaz S, Hewitt K, Ngui SL, Boxall E, Teo CG, Morgan D - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Details of cases of acute hepatitis E (HEV) infections, 2005. *Contact with hepatitis E patients who recently returned from hyperendemic countries; †24-year-old woman infected with HEV genotype 1; ‡45-year-old Caucasian man who traveled to Iraq.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600160&req=5

Figure 2: Details of cases of acute hepatitis E (HEV) infections, 2005. *Contact with hepatitis E patients who recently returned from hyperendemic countries; †24-year-old woman infected with HEV genotype 1; ‡45-year-old Caucasian man who traveled to Iraq.
Mentions: The travel history of the 329 patients is summarized in Figure 2. For 102 (31%) patients, pre-illness travel information was recorded on the laboratory request form. Travel status was obtained for 44 additional patients through follow-up, and 33 patients who had not traveled outside the United Kingdom were considered to be indigenous case-patients. Twenty-three (70%) indigenous case-patients were >55 years of age, compared with 26 (24%) of 110 travel-associated case-patients; the median age was 65 years (interquartile range [IQR] 50–74 years) and 41 years (IQR 29–54) (p<0.0001) respectively. Thirty-two of the indigenous case-patients (97%) had Caucasian names (name classification was used as a proxy for ethnicity) compared with 21 (19%) of 110 travelers (p<0.001).

Bottom Line: In 2005, 329 cases of hepatitis E virus infection were confirmed in England and Wales; 33 were confirmed indigenous infections, and a further 67 were estimated to be indigenous infections.Hepatitis E should be considered in the investigation of patients with hepatitis even if they have no history of travel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Emerging Infections and Zoonoses Department, Centre for Infections, Health Protection Agency, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
In 2005, 329 cases of hepatitis E virus infection were confirmed in England and Wales; 33 were confirmed indigenous infections, and a further 67 were estimated to be indigenous infections. Hepatitis E should be considered in the investigation of patients with hepatitis even if they have no history of travel.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus