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Q fever update, Maritime Canada.

Marrie TJ, Campbell N, McNeil SA, Webster D, Hatchette TF - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Since the 1990s, reports of Q fever in Nova Scotia, Canada, have declined.Passive surveillance for Q fever in Nova Scotia and its neighboring provinces in eastern Canada indicates that the clinical manifestation of Q fever in the Maritime provinces is pneumonia and that incidence of the disease may fluctuate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Since the 1990s, reports of Q fever in Nova Scotia, Canada, have declined. Passive surveillance for Q fever in Nova Scotia and its neighboring provinces in eastern Canada indicates that the clinical manifestation of Q fever in the Maritime provinces is pneumonia and that incidence of the disease may fluctuate.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Chest radiograph of patient 11 at time of admission to hospital, before intubation, demonstrating extensive bilateral airspace disease.
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Figure 1: Chest radiograph of patient 11 at time of admission to hospital, before intubation, demonstrating extensive bilateral airspace disease.

Mentions: In terms of clinical signs, all 11 patients had sweats, fever, and myalgia; 9 had chills; 8 had a cough; 7 were short of breath; 5 each had nausea, diarrhea, sputum production, and confusion; 4 had chest pain, which was pleuritic for 2; and 2 had abdominal pain and vomiting. Of the 7 patients for whom chest radiographs were taken, 6 had acute opacities compatible with pneumonia. Patient 11 had diffuse bilateral pneumonia, which required him to be admitted to an intensive care unit to receive ventilatory support (Figure).


Q fever update, Maritime Canada.

Marrie TJ, Campbell N, McNeil SA, Webster D, Hatchette TF - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Chest radiograph of patient 11 at time of admission to hospital, before intubation, demonstrating extensive bilateral airspace disease.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600158&req=5

Figure 1: Chest radiograph of patient 11 at time of admission to hospital, before intubation, demonstrating extensive bilateral airspace disease.
Mentions: In terms of clinical signs, all 11 patients had sweats, fever, and myalgia; 9 had chills; 8 had a cough; 7 were short of breath; 5 each had nausea, diarrhea, sputum production, and confusion; 4 had chest pain, which was pleuritic for 2; and 2 had abdominal pain and vomiting. Of the 7 patients for whom chest radiographs were taken, 6 had acute opacities compatible with pneumonia. Patient 11 had diffuse bilateral pneumonia, which required him to be admitted to an intensive care unit to receive ventilatory support (Figure).

Bottom Line: Since the 1990s, reports of Q fever in Nova Scotia, Canada, have declined.Passive surveillance for Q fever in Nova Scotia and its neighboring provinces in eastern Canada indicates that the clinical manifestation of Q fever in the Maritime provinces is pneumonia and that incidence of the disease may fluctuate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Since the 1990s, reports of Q fever in Nova Scotia, Canada, have declined. Passive surveillance for Q fever in Nova Scotia and its neighboring provinces in eastern Canada indicates that the clinical manifestation of Q fever in the Maritime provinces is pneumonia and that incidence of the disease may fluctuate.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus