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Dogs as sources and sentinels of parasites in humans and wildlife, northern Canada.

Salb AL, Barkema HW, Elkin BT, Thompson RC, Whiteside DP, Black SR, Dubey JP, Kutz SJ - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: A minimum of 11 genera of parasites, including 7 known or suspected to cause zoonoses, were detected in dogs in 2 northern Canadian communities.Dogs in remote settlements receive minimal veterinary care and may serve as sources and sentinels for parasites in persons and wildlife, and as parasite bridges between wildlife and humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Calgary Zoo Animal Health Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

ABSTRACT
A minimum of 11 genera of parasites, including 7 known or suspected to cause zoonoses, were detected in dogs in 2 northern Canadian communities. Dogs in remote settlements receive minimal veterinary care and may serve as sources and sentinels for parasites in persons and wildlife, and as parasite bridges between wildlife and humans.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Husbandry practices for adult dogs (>6 months of age) in Fort Resolution and Fort Chipewyan, northern Canada. Results of all comparisons were significantly different between the 2 communities (p<0.05).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Husbandry practices for adult dogs (>6 months of age) in Fort Resolution and Fort Chipewyan, northern Canada. Results of all comparisons were significantly different between the 2 communities (p<0.05).

Mentions: The study population consisted of a variety of breeds and cross-breeds, including Siberian husky, Laborador retriever, German shepherd, terriers, and other types. Most dogs were housed outdoors and many were fed fish and game (raw, frozen, fresh, cooked, or dry). Of dogs eating wild game, they ate moose (95.8%), muskrat (53.5%), caribou (54.9%), bison (45.1%), rabbit (28.2%), beaver (25.4%), elk (15.5%), and deer (14.1%) (Figures 1, 2).


Dogs as sources and sentinels of parasites in humans and wildlife, northern Canada.

Salb AL, Barkema HW, Elkin BT, Thompson RC, Whiteside DP, Black SR, Dubey JP, Kutz SJ - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Husbandry practices for adult dogs (>6 months of age) in Fort Resolution and Fort Chipewyan, northern Canada. Results of all comparisons were significantly different between the 2 communities (p<0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600154&req=5

Figure 1: Husbandry practices for adult dogs (>6 months of age) in Fort Resolution and Fort Chipewyan, northern Canada. Results of all comparisons were significantly different between the 2 communities (p<0.05).
Mentions: The study population consisted of a variety of breeds and cross-breeds, including Siberian husky, Laborador retriever, German shepherd, terriers, and other types. Most dogs were housed outdoors and many were fed fish and game (raw, frozen, fresh, cooked, or dry). Of dogs eating wild game, they ate moose (95.8%), muskrat (53.5%), caribou (54.9%), bison (45.1%), rabbit (28.2%), beaver (25.4%), elk (15.5%), and deer (14.1%) (Figures 1, 2).

Bottom Line: A minimum of 11 genera of parasites, including 7 known or suspected to cause zoonoses, were detected in dogs in 2 northern Canadian communities.Dogs in remote settlements receive minimal veterinary care and may serve as sources and sentinels for parasites in persons and wildlife, and as parasite bridges between wildlife and humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Calgary Zoo Animal Health Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

ABSTRACT
A minimum of 11 genera of parasites, including 7 known or suspected to cause zoonoses, were detected in dogs in 2 northern Canadian communities. Dogs in remote settlements receive minimal veterinary care and may serve as sources and sentinels for parasites in persons and wildlife, and as parasite bridges between wildlife and humans.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus