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Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae serotype a, North American Arctic, 2000-2005.

Bruce MG, Deeks SL, Zulz T, Navarro C, Palacios C, Case C, Hemsley C, Hennessy T, Corriveau A, Larke B, Sobel I, Lovgren M, Debyle C, Tsang R, Parkinson AJ - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Common clinical manifestations included meningitis, pneumonia, and septic arthritis.Overall annual incidence was 0.9 cases per 100,000 population.Incidence among indigenous children <2 years of age in Alaska and northern Canada was 21 and 102, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4055 Tudor Circle Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. zwa8@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
Before the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines, rates of invasive H. influenzae disease among indigenous people of the North American Arctic were among the highest in the world. Routine vaccination reduced rates to low levels; however, serotype replacement with non-type b strains may result in a reemergence of invasive disease in children. We reviewed population-based data on invasive H. influenzae in Alaska and northern Canada from 2000-2005; 138 cases were reported. Among 88 typeable isolates, 42 (48%) were H. influenzae type a (Hia); 35 (83%) occurred in indigenous peoples. Among Hia patients, median age was 1.1 years; 62% were male; 1 adult died. Common clinical manifestations included meningitis, pneumonia, and septic arthritis. Overall annual incidence was 0.9 cases per 100,000 population. Incidence among indigenous children <2 years of age in Alaska and northern Canada was 21 and 102, respectively. Serotype a is now the most common H. influenzae serotype in the North American Arctic; the highest rates are among indigenous children.

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Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of representative Haemophilus influenzae serotype a isolates from Alaska and Northern Canada, 2000–2005 (N = 14).
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Figure 2: Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of representative Haemophilus influenzae serotype a isolates from Alaska and Northern Canada, 2000–2005 (N = 14).

Mentions: PFGE was performed on 9 Hia isolates from Alaska and 19 isolates from northern Canada. With 1 exception, all isolates were found to be closely related (<3-band difference) with a Dice correlation of >85% (Figure 2). All 28 isolates were negative for the IS1016-bexA deletion by PCR.


Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae serotype a, North American Arctic, 2000-2005.

Bruce MG, Deeks SL, Zulz T, Navarro C, Palacios C, Case C, Hemsley C, Hennessy T, Corriveau A, Larke B, Sobel I, Lovgren M, Debyle C, Tsang R, Parkinson AJ - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of representative Haemophilus influenzae serotype a isolates from Alaska and Northern Canada, 2000–2005 (N = 14).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600153&req=5

Figure 2: Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of representative Haemophilus influenzae serotype a isolates from Alaska and Northern Canada, 2000–2005 (N = 14).
Mentions: PFGE was performed on 9 Hia isolates from Alaska and 19 isolates from northern Canada. With 1 exception, all isolates were found to be closely related (<3-band difference) with a Dice correlation of >85% (Figure 2). All 28 isolates were negative for the IS1016-bexA deletion by PCR.

Bottom Line: Common clinical manifestations included meningitis, pneumonia, and septic arthritis.Overall annual incidence was 0.9 cases per 100,000 population.Incidence among indigenous children <2 years of age in Alaska and northern Canada was 21 and 102, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4055 Tudor Circle Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. zwa8@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
Before the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines, rates of invasive H. influenzae disease among indigenous people of the North American Arctic were among the highest in the world. Routine vaccination reduced rates to low levels; however, serotype replacement with non-type b strains may result in a reemergence of invasive disease in children. We reviewed population-based data on invasive H. influenzae in Alaska and northern Canada from 2000-2005; 138 cases were reported. Among 88 typeable isolates, 42 (48%) were H. influenzae type a (Hia); 35 (83%) occurred in indigenous peoples. Among Hia patients, median age was 1.1 years; 62% were male; 1 adult died. Common clinical manifestations included meningitis, pneumonia, and septic arthritis. Overall annual incidence was 0.9 cases per 100,000 population. Incidence among indigenous children <2 years of age in Alaska and northern Canada was 21 and 102, respectively. Serotype a is now the most common H. influenzae serotype in the North American Arctic; the highest rates are among indigenous children.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus