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Sindbis virus infection in resident birds, migratory birds, and humans, Finland.

Kurkela S, Rätti O, Huhtamo E, Uzcátegui NY, Nuorti JP, Laakkonen J, Manni T, Helle P, Vaheri A, Vapalahti O - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: SINV antibodies were first found in 3 birds (red-backed shrike, robin, song thrush) during their spring migration to northern Europe.Among 2,529 persons, the age-standardized seroprevalence (1999-2003) was 5.2%; seroprevalence and incidence (1995-2003) were highest in North Karelia (eastern Finland).Grouse may contribute to the epidemiology of SINV in humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Haartman Institute at the University of Helsinki, Haartmaninkatu 3, Helsinki, Finland. satu.kurkela@helsinki.fi

ABSTRACT
Sindbis virus (SINV), a mosquito-borne virus that causes rash and arthritis, has been causing outbreaks in humans every seventh year in northern Europe. To gain a better understanding of SINV epidemiology in Finland, we searched for SINV antibodies in 621 resident grouse, whose population declines have coincided with human SINV outbreaks, and in 836 migratory birds. We used hemagglutination-inhibition and neutralization tests for the bird samples and enzyme immunoassays and hemagglutination-inhibition for the human samples. SINV antibodies were first found in 3 birds (red-backed shrike, robin, song thrush) during their spring migration to northern Europe. Of the grouse, 27.4% were seropositive in 2003 (1 year after a human outbreak), but only 1.4% were seropositive in 2004. Among 2,529 persons, the age-standardized seroprevalence (1999-2003) was 5.2%; seroprevalence and incidence (1995-2003) were highest in North Karelia (eastern Finland). Grouse may contribute to the epidemiology of SINV in humans.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean seroprevalence (1999–2003) and average annualized incidence (1995–2003) of Sindbis virus infection in the human population, Finland, according to age groups. *Standardized according to the age distribution of the Finnish population in the respective period.
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Figure 2: Mean seroprevalence (1999–2003) and average annualized incidence (1995–2003) of Sindbis virus infection in the human population, Finland, according to age groups. *Standardized according to the age distribution of the Finnish population in the respective period.

Mentions: A total of 2,529 human specimens were included in our analysis. When the data were standardized according to the age distribution of the Finnish population, the estimated seroprevalence was 5.2% (Figure 2). Geographically, the seroprevalence was high in eastern Finland, especially in North Karelia and Kainuu, but also in central Ostrobothnia in western Finland (Figure 1, panel B). Seroprevalence was significantly higher for men (6.0%; mean age of all men studied 41.8 years) than for women (4.1%; mean age of all women studied 44.1 years) (χ2 4,721, p<0.030). Seroprevalence increased with age, reaching 15.4% among persons 60–69 years of age (Figure 2).


Sindbis virus infection in resident birds, migratory birds, and humans, Finland.

Kurkela S, Rätti O, Huhtamo E, Uzcátegui NY, Nuorti JP, Laakkonen J, Manni T, Helle P, Vaheri A, Vapalahti O - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Mean seroprevalence (1999–2003) and average annualized incidence (1995–2003) of Sindbis virus infection in the human population, Finland, according to age groups. *Standardized according to the age distribution of the Finnish population in the respective period.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600146&req=5

Figure 2: Mean seroprevalence (1999–2003) and average annualized incidence (1995–2003) of Sindbis virus infection in the human population, Finland, according to age groups. *Standardized according to the age distribution of the Finnish population in the respective period.
Mentions: A total of 2,529 human specimens were included in our analysis. When the data were standardized according to the age distribution of the Finnish population, the estimated seroprevalence was 5.2% (Figure 2). Geographically, the seroprevalence was high in eastern Finland, especially in North Karelia and Kainuu, but also in central Ostrobothnia in western Finland (Figure 1, panel B). Seroprevalence was significantly higher for men (6.0%; mean age of all men studied 41.8 years) than for women (4.1%; mean age of all women studied 44.1 years) (χ2 4,721, p<0.030). Seroprevalence increased with age, reaching 15.4% among persons 60–69 years of age (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: SINV antibodies were first found in 3 birds (red-backed shrike, robin, song thrush) during their spring migration to northern Europe.Among 2,529 persons, the age-standardized seroprevalence (1999-2003) was 5.2%; seroprevalence and incidence (1995-2003) were highest in North Karelia (eastern Finland).Grouse may contribute to the epidemiology of SINV in humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Haartman Institute at the University of Helsinki, Haartmaninkatu 3, Helsinki, Finland. satu.kurkela@helsinki.fi

ABSTRACT
Sindbis virus (SINV), a mosquito-borne virus that causes rash and arthritis, has been causing outbreaks in humans every seventh year in northern Europe. To gain a better understanding of SINV epidemiology in Finland, we searched for SINV antibodies in 621 resident grouse, whose population declines have coincided with human SINV outbreaks, and in 836 migratory birds. We used hemagglutination-inhibition and neutralization tests for the bird samples and enzyme immunoassays and hemagglutination-inhibition for the human samples. SINV antibodies were first found in 3 birds (red-backed shrike, robin, song thrush) during their spring migration to northern Europe. Of the grouse, 27.4% were seropositive in 2003 (1 year after a human outbreak), but only 1.4% were seropositive in 2004. Among 2,529 persons, the age-standardized seroprevalence (1999-2003) was 5.2%; seroprevalence and incidence (1995-2003) were highest in North Karelia (eastern Finland). Grouse may contribute to the epidemiology of SINV in humans.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus