Limits...
Avian influenza virus (H5N1) replication in feathers of domestic waterfowl.

Yamamoto Y, Nakamura K, Okamatsu M, Yamada M, Mase M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: We examined feathers of domestic ducks and geese inoculated with 2 different avian influenza virus (H5N1) genotypes.Together with virus isolation from the skin, the detection of viral antigens and ultrastructural observation of the virions in the feather epidermis raise the possibility of feathers as sources of infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Animal Health, 3-1-5 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. yyu@affrc.go.jp

ABSTRACT
We examined feathers of domestic ducks and geese inoculated with 2 different avian influenza virus (H5N1) genotypes. Together with virus isolation from the skin, the detection of viral antigens and ultrastructural observation of the virions in the feather epidermis raise the possibility of feathers as sources of infection.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Pathology of a duck infected with A/chicken/Yamaguchi/7/2004. A) Electron microscopy of the feather epidermis showing virions observed between epidermal cells with the desmosome (d) and nucleus (n). Bar = 500 nm. B) Spherical virion with envelope spikes. Bar = 100 nm. C) Budding process of virion (arrowhead). Bar = 250 nm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600139&req=5

Figure 2: Pathology of a duck infected with A/chicken/Yamaguchi/7/2004. A) Electron microscopy of the feather epidermis showing virions observed between epidermal cells with the desmosome (d) and nucleus (n). Bar = 500 nm. B) Spherical virion with envelope spikes. Bar = 100 nm. C) Budding process of virion (arrowhead). Bar = 250 nm.

Mentions: Inoculated birds did not exhibit apparent clinical signs, except for unilateral corneal opacity in a goose inoculated with Ck/Yama/7/04 on day 5 postinoculation. Results of histopathologic and virologic examinations are summarized in the Table. Histologically, viral antigens were occasionally detected in the feather epidermal cells with or without epidermal necrosis (Figure 1, panels A and B). Some affected feathers were accompanied by heterophilic and lymphocytic infiltration in the inner feather pulp. Other tissues in the skin were negative for influenza virus by immunohistochemical analysis with the exception of very rare positive reaction in stromal cells in the feather pulp. Virus isolation from the skin was positive in 1 duck and 1 goose inoculated with Ck/Yama/7/04; the viral titers were 103.5 and 104.5 EID50/g, respectively. All ducks and geese inoculated with Ck/Miya/K11/07 tested positive for the isolation; the viral titers were 102.5–104.5 EID50/g. Ultrastructurally, round, enveloped virions 80 to 100 nm in diameter were observed between feather epidermal cells in both domestic ducks and geese (Figure 2, panels A and B). Spherical virions budding from cell surface were occasionally observed (Figure 2, panel C).


Avian influenza virus (H5N1) replication in feathers of domestic waterfowl.

Yamamoto Y, Nakamura K, Okamatsu M, Yamada M, Mase M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Pathology of a duck infected with A/chicken/Yamaguchi/7/2004. A) Electron microscopy of the feather epidermis showing virions observed between epidermal cells with the desmosome (d) and nucleus (n). Bar = 500 nm. B) Spherical virion with envelope spikes. Bar = 100 nm. C) Budding process of virion (arrowhead). Bar = 250 nm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600139&req=5

Figure 2: Pathology of a duck infected with A/chicken/Yamaguchi/7/2004. A) Electron microscopy of the feather epidermis showing virions observed between epidermal cells with the desmosome (d) and nucleus (n). Bar = 500 nm. B) Spherical virion with envelope spikes. Bar = 100 nm. C) Budding process of virion (arrowhead). Bar = 250 nm.
Mentions: Inoculated birds did not exhibit apparent clinical signs, except for unilateral corneal opacity in a goose inoculated with Ck/Yama/7/04 on day 5 postinoculation. Results of histopathologic and virologic examinations are summarized in the Table. Histologically, viral antigens were occasionally detected in the feather epidermal cells with or without epidermal necrosis (Figure 1, panels A and B). Some affected feathers were accompanied by heterophilic and lymphocytic infiltration in the inner feather pulp. Other tissues in the skin were negative for influenza virus by immunohistochemical analysis with the exception of very rare positive reaction in stromal cells in the feather pulp. Virus isolation from the skin was positive in 1 duck and 1 goose inoculated with Ck/Yama/7/04; the viral titers were 103.5 and 104.5 EID50/g, respectively. All ducks and geese inoculated with Ck/Miya/K11/07 tested positive for the isolation; the viral titers were 102.5–104.5 EID50/g. Ultrastructurally, round, enveloped virions 80 to 100 nm in diameter were observed between feather epidermal cells in both domestic ducks and geese (Figure 2, panels A and B). Spherical virions budding from cell surface were occasionally observed (Figure 2, panel C).

Bottom Line: We examined feathers of domestic ducks and geese inoculated with 2 different avian influenza virus (H5N1) genotypes.Together with virus isolation from the skin, the detection of viral antigens and ultrastructural observation of the virions in the feather epidermis raise the possibility of feathers as sources of infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Animal Health, 3-1-5 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. yyu@affrc.go.jp

ABSTRACT
We examined feathers of domestic ducks and geese inoculated with 2 different avian influenza virus (H5N1) genotypes. Together with virus isolation from the skin, the detection of viral antigens and ultrastructural observation of the virions in the feather epidermis raise the possibility of feathers as sources of infection.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus