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CD8+ T-cell interleukin-7 receptor alpha expression as a potential indicator of disease status in HIV-infected children.

Sharma TS, Hughes J, Murillo A, Riley J, Soares A, Little F, Mitchell CD, Hanekom WA - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: In a cross-sectional evaluation, we used flow cytometry to measure CD127+ expression on CD8+ T-cells in whole blood from HIV-infected children with varying disease status.This was compared with expression of CD38 on this subset, currently used in clinical practice as a marker of disease status. 51 HIV-infected children were enrolled.In contrast, we found no association between CD38 expression and these disease status markers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Initiation and modification of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children depend on viral load and CD4+ T-cell count. However, these surrogates have limitations, and complementary immunological markers to assess therapeutic response are needed. Our aim was to evaluate CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 as a marker of disease status in HIV-infected children, based on adult data suggesting its usefulness. We hypothesized that CD127 expression on CD8+ T-cells is lower in children with more advanced disease.

Methods: In a cross-sectional evaluation, we used flow cytometry to measure CD127+ expression on CD8+ T-cells in whole blood from HIV-infected children with varying disease status. This was compared with expression of CD38 on this subset, currently used in clinical practice as a marker of disease status.

Results: 51 HIV-infected children were enrolled. There was a strong positive correlation between CD127 expression on CD8+ T-cells and CD4+ T-cell count, and height and weight z-scores, and a strong negative correlation between CD127 expression and viral load. In contrast, we found no association between CD38 expression and these disease status markers.

Conclusions: CD8+ T-cell CD127 expression is significantly higher in children with better HIV disease control, and may have a role as an immunologic indicator of disease status. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the utility of this marker as a potential indicator of HIV disease progression.

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A–B. Association between CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 (A.) and of CD38 (B.) and CD4+ lymphocyte frequency, in 48 HIV-infected children. A Spearman test was used to assess correlations. C–D. Relationship of CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 (C) and of CD38 (D) with degree of immunosuppression, as categorized by current CD4+ lymphocyte frequency. Mann Whitney test was used to assess differences between the groups.
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pone-0003986-g002: A–B. Association between CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 (A.) and of CD38 (B.) and CD4+ lymphocyte frequency, in 48 HIV-infected children. A Spearman test was used to assess correlations. C–D. Relationship of CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 (C) and of CD38 (D) with degree of immunosuppression, as categorized by current CD4+ lymphocyte frequency. Mann Whitney test was used to assess differences between the groups.

Mentions: Our hypothesis was that IL-7Rα (CD127) expression on CD8+ T-cells (Figure 1) would be a marker of clinical HIV disease status in infected infants, children and adolescents. We first evaluated the relationship between CD127 expression and CD4+ T-cell count, the most widely used immunological surrogate of HIV disease. We confirmed previous observations that there was a strong correlation between CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 and current CD4+ lymphocyte frequency (Figure 2a) [23]. This association was much stronger than the expected negative association between CD4+ lymphocyte frequency and CD38 expression on CD8+ T cells (Figure 2b), a marker which has been proposed to be a good surrogate of HIV disease status [24].


CD8+ T-cell interleukin-7 receptor alpha expression as a potential indicator of disease status in HIV-infected children.

Sharma TS, Hughes J, Murillo A, Riley J, Soares A, Little F, Mitchell CD, Hanekom WA - PLoS ONE (2008)

A–B. Association between CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 (A.) and of CD38 (B.) and CD4+ lymphocyte frequency, in 48 HIV-infected children. A Spearman test was used to assess correlations. C–D. Relationship of CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 (C) and of CD38 (D) with degree of immunosuppression, as categorized by current CD4+ lymphocyte frequency. Mann Whitney test was used to assess differences between the groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2599882&req=5

pone-0003986-g002: A–B. Association between CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 (A.) and of CD38 (B.) and CD4+ lymphocyte frequency, in 48 HIV-infected children. A Spearman test was used to assess correlations. C–D. Relationship of CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 (C) and of CD38 (D) with degree of immunosuppression, as categorized by current CD4+ lymphocyte frequency. Mann Whitney test was used to assess differences between the groups.
Mentions: Our hypothesis was that IL-7Rα (CD127) expression on CD8+ T-cells (Figure 1) would be a marker of clinical HIV disease status in infected infants, children and adolescents. We first evaluated the relationship between CD127 expression and CD4+ T-cell count, the most widely used immunological surrogate of HIV disease. We confirmed previous observations that there was a strong correlation between CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 and current CD4+ lymphocyte frequency (Figure 2a) [23]. This association was much stronger than the expected negative association between CD4+ lymphocyte frequency and CD38 expression on CD8+ T cells (Figure 2b), a marker which has been proposed to be a good surrogate of HIV disease status [24].

Bottom Line: In a cross-sectional evaluation, we used flow cytometry to measure CD127+ expression on CD8+ T-cells in whole blood from HIV-infected children with varying disease status.This was compared with expression of CD38 on this subset, currently used in clinical practice as a marker of disease status. 51 HIV-infected children were enrolled.In contrast, we found no association between CD38 expression and these disease status markers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Initiation and modification of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children depend on viral load and CD4+ T-cell count. However, these surrogates have limitations, and complementary immunological markers to assess therapeutic response are needed. Our aim was to evaluate CD8+ T-cell expression of CD127 as a marker of disease status in HIV-infected children, based on adult data suggesting its usefulness. We hypothesized that CD127 expression on CD8+ T-cells is lower in children with more advanced disease.

Methods: In a cross-sectional evaluation, we used flow cytometry to measure CD127+ expression on CD8+ T-cells in whole blood from HIV-infected children with varying disease status. This was compared with expression of CD38 on this subset, currently used in clinical practice as a marker of disease status.

Results: 51 HIV-infected children were enrolled. There was a strong positive correlation between CD127 expression on CD8+ T-cells and CD4+ T-cell count, and height and weight z-scores, and a strong negative correlation between CD127 expression and viral load. In contrast, we found no association between CD38 expression and these disease status markers.

Conclusions: CD8+ T-cell CD127 expression is significantly higher in children with better HIV disease control, and may have a role as an immunologic indicator of disease status. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the utility of this marker as a potential indicator of HIV disease progression.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus