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Profunda femoris artery pseudoaneurysm after surgery and trauma.

Unay K, Poyanli O, Akan K, Poyanli A - Strategies Trauma Limb Reconstr (2008)

Bottom Line: Two cases of profunda femoris artery pseudoaneurysm with two rare causes are presented.The first one is a core decompression of femoral head for osteonecrosis and the second one is a proximal femur fracture nailing.Awareness and careful follow-up are the key issues for the early diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic and Traumatology, Goztepe Research and Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey, kunay69@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT
Pseudoaneurysms of the profunda femoris artery have been reported following different types of trauma and from orthopedic procedures performed in the proximal femur. Two cases of profunda femoris artery pseudoaneurysm with two rare causes are presented. The first one is a core decompression of femoral head for osteonecrosis and the second one is a proximal femur fracture nailing. Awareness and careful follow-up are the key issues for the early diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The angiogram and embolization of pseudoaneurysm from the profunda femoris artery after the core decompression surgery
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Fig2: The angiogram and embolization of pseudoaneurysm from the profunda femoris artery after the core decompression surgery

Mentions: A 32-year-old female with multiple sclerosis presented with thigh pain and weakness in the left lower extremity for 3 months. She had a history of occasional use of methylprednisolone in the last 3 years for her relapse periods. Physical examination revealed limitation of motion of the left hip. The conventional laboratory data including prothrombin time (PT), International Normalized Ratio (INR), activated partial prothromboplastin time (aPTT), complete blood cell count, urine analysis and liver function tests were normal. Plain radiographs disclosed no pathologic changes of the left femoral head. MRI showed abnormal signal intensities in the superior regions of the left and right femoral head consistent with avascular necrosis (Fig. 1). Two stage core decompressions were planed for the bilateral femoral head avascular necrosis. The left side was first to be operated because of the pain with using a lateral incision. During the surgery, lancet was gone deeper than expected for the fascial incision but no bleeding was observed. The rest of the operation was carried out as usual. On the 4th postoperative day the patient developed an intense thigh swelling accompanied with bleeding from the surgical wound. Her hemoglobin levels fell from 12.1 to 7.9 g/dl. Then, an angiogram was performed which revealed a pseudoaneurysm from the profunda femoris artery (Fig. 2). This was successfully and selectively embolised with coil. The patient was discharged 7 days after her embolization with recovery.Fig. 1


Profunda femoris artery pseudoaneurysm after surgery and trauma.

Unay K, Poyanli O, Akan K, Poyanli A - Strategies Trauma Limb Reconstr (2008)

The angiogram and embolization of pseudoaneurysm from the profunda femoris artery after the core decompression surgery
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2599797&req=5

Fig2: The angiogram and embolization of pseudoaneurysm from the profunda femoris artery after the core decompression surgery
Mentions: A 32-year-old female with multiple sclerosis presented with thigh pain and weakness in the left lower extremity for 3 months. She had a history of occasional use of methylprednisolone in the last 3 years for her relapse periods. Physical examination revealed limitation of motion of the left hip. The conventional laboratory data including prothrombin time (PT), International Normalized Ratio (INR), activated partial prothromboplastin time (aPTT), complete blood cell count, urine analysis and liver function tests were normal. Plain radiographs disclosed no pathologic changes of the left femoral head. MRI showed abnormal signal intensities in the superior regions of the left and right femoral head consistent with avascular necrosis (Fig. 1). Two stage core decompressions were planed for the bilateral femoral head avascular necrosis. The left side was first to be operated because of the pain with using a lateral incision. During the surgery, lancet was gone deeper than expected for the fascial incision but no bleeding was observed. The rest of the operation was carried out as usual. On the 4th postoperative day the patient developed an intense thigh swelling accompanied with bleeding from the surgical wound. Her hemoglobin levels fell from 12.1 to 7.9 g/dl. Then, an angiogram was performed which revealed a pseudoaneurysm from the profunda femoris artery (Fig. 2). This was successfully and selectively embolised with coil. The patient was discharged 7 days after her embolization with recovery.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Two cases of profunda femoris artery pseudoaneurysm with two rare causes are presented.The first one is a core decompression of femoral head for osteonecrosis and the second one is a proximal femur fracture nailing.Awareness and careful follow-up are the key issues for the early diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic and Traumatology, Goztepe Research and Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey, kunay69@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT
Pseudoaneurysms of the profunda femoris artery have been reported following different types of trauma and from orthopedic procedures performed in the proximal femur. Two cases of profunda femoris artery pseudoaneurysm with two rare causes are presented. The first one is a core decompression of femoral head for osteonecrosis and the second one is a proximal femur fracture nailing. Awareness and careful follow-up are the key issues for the early diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus