Limits...
Principles of nucleic acid hybridization and comparison with monoclonal antibody technology for the diagnosis of infectious diseases.

Edberg SC - Yale J Biol Med (1985 Sep-Oct)

Bottom Line: Currently, research and development are centered in choosing the particular nucleic acid to analyze, establishing the most efficient vector system for amplifying the nucleic acid, generating an efficient means of selecting the particular nucleic acid fragment specific for the microorganism, and in measuring the hybridization reaction.While immunological techniques have been utilized in the clinical laboratory for over thirty years, the means of detecting nucleic acid hybridization reactions are just beginning to be usable in the clinical diagnostic laboratory.Much of nucleic acid hybridization research is proprietary, and a particular challenge is to develop a means whereby information can be used for the progress of science as a whole when generated by private ownership.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Until the 1980s the diagnosis of specific etiologic agents of infectious diseases rested with their isolation in vitro and identification by analysis of their phenotypic characteristics. In the 1970s the concept of a microbial species evolved from phenotypic analysis to nucleic acid homology. Currently, nucleic acid sequences specific for a given species are being isolated and amplified and utilized not only to identify the pathogen after it has been grown in vitro but also elucidate it directly in biological material. The procedures for making nucleic acid hybridization probes are analogous to the generation of monoclonal antibody tests. Currently, research and development are centered in choosing the particular nucleic acid to analyze, establishing the most efficient vector system for amplifying the nucleic acid, generating an efficient means of selecting the particular nucleic acid fragment specific for the microorganism, and in measuring the hybridization reaction. While immunological techniques have been utilized in the clinical laboratory for over thirty years, the means of detecting nucleic acid hybridization reactions are just beginning to be usable in the clinical diagnostic laboratory. Much of nucleic acid hybridization research is proprietary, and a particular challenge is to develop a means whereby information can be used for the progress of science as a whole when generated by private ownership.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2589955&req=5


Principles of nucleic acid hybridization and comparison with monoclonal antibody technology for the diagnosis of infectious diseases.

Edberg SC - Yale J Biol Med (1985 Sep-Oct)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2589955&req=5

Bottom Line: Currently, research and development are centered in choosing the particular nucleic acid to analyze, establishing the most efficient vector system for amplifying the nucleic acid, generating an efficient means of selecting the particular nucleic acid fragment specific for the microorganism, and in measuring the hybridization reaction.While immunological techniques have been utilized in the clinical laboratory for over thirty years, the means of detecting nucleic acid hybridization reactions are just beginning to be usable in the clinical diagnostic laboratory.Much of nucleic acid hybridization research is proprietary, and a particular challenge is to develop a means whereby information can be used for the progress of science as a whole when generated by private ownership.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Until the 1980s the diagnosis of specific etiologic agents of infectious diseases rested with their isolation in vitro and identification by analysis of their phenotypic characteristics. In the 1970s the concept of a microbial species evolved from phenotypic analysis to nucleic acid homology. Currently, nucleic acid sequences specific for a given species are being isolated and amplified and utilized not only to identify the pathogen after it has been grown in vitro but also elucidate it directly in biological material. The procedures for making nucleic acid hybridization probes are analogous to the generation of monoclonal antibody tests. Currently, research and development are centered in choosing the particular nucleic acid to analyze, establishing the most efficient vector system for amplifying the nucleic acid, generating an efficient means of selecting the particular nucleic acid fragment specific for the microorganism, and in measuring the hybridization reaction. While immunological techniques have been utilized in the clinical laboratory for over thirty years, the means of detecting nucleic acid hybridization reactions are just beginning to be usable in the clinical diagnostic laboratory. Much of nucleic acid hybridization research is proprietary, and a particular challenge is to develop a means whereby information can be used for the progress of science as a whole when generated by private ownership.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus