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Lifestyle counseling in hypertension-related visits--analysis of video-taped general practice visits.

Milder IE, Blokstra A, de Groot J, van Dulmen S, Bemelmans WJ - BMC Fam Pract (2008)

Bottom Line: Supporting factors were not discussed at all.In 40% of the hypertension-related visits lifestyle topics were discussed.However, both the frequency and quality of lifestyle advice can be improved.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: RIVM (National Institute of Public Health and the Environment), Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. ivon.milder@rivm.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: The general practitioner (GP) can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle, which is especially relevant in people with an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases due to hypertension. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency and content of lifestyle counseling about weight loss, nutrition, physical activity, and smoking by GPs in hypertension-related visits. A distinction was made between the assessment of lifestyle (gathering information or measuring weight or waist circumference) and giving lifestyle advice (giving a specific advice to change the patient's behavior or referring the patient to other sources of information or other health professionals).

Methods: For this study, we observed 212 video recordings of hypertension-related visits collected within the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice in 2000/2001.

Results: The mean duration of visits was 9.8 minutes (range 2.5 to 30 minutes). In 40% of the visits lifestyle was discussed (n = 84), but in 81% of these visits this discussion lasted shorter than a quarter of the visit. An assessment of lifestyle was made in 77 visits (36%), most commonly regarding body weight and nutrition. In most cases the patient initiated the discussion about nutrition and physical activity, whereas the assessment of weight and smoking status was mostly initiated by the GP. In 35 visits (17%) the GP gave lifestyle advice, but in only one fifth of these visits the patient's motivation or perceived barriers for changing behavior were assessed. Supporting factors were not discussed at all.

Conclusion: In 40% of the hypertension-related visits lifestyle topics were discussed. However, both the frequency and quality of lifestyle advice can be improved.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Duration of lifestyle counseling. * Less than a quarter of the visit.
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Figure 1: Duration of lifestyle counseling. * Less than a quarter of the visit.

Mentions: The mean ± SD duration of complete visits was 9.8 ± 4.7 minutes, ranging from 2.5 to 30 minutes. A lifestyle topic was discussed in 40% of the visits. In most cases, the duration of lifestyle counseling was brief (figure 1). In 7% of the visits lifestyle counseling lasted a quarter of the visit or more, and in 1% this was half the visit or more. The duration of the visit tended to be longer when lifestyle was discussed than when it was not discussed (mean duration ± SD: 10.4 ± 4.3 minutes vs 9.5 ± 4.8 minutes; P = 0.57).


Lifestyle counseling in hypertension-related visits--analysis of video-taped general practice visits.

Milder IE, Blokstra A, de Groot J, van Dulmen S, Bemelmans WJ - BMC Fam Pract (2008)

Duration of lifestyle counseling. * Less than a quarter of the visit.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2577675&req=5

Figure 1: Duration of lifestyle counseling. * Less than a quarter of the visit.
Mentions: The mean ± SD duration of complete visits was 9.8 ± 4.7 minutes, ranging from 2.5 to 30 minutes. A lifestyle topic was discussed in 40% of the visits. In most cases, the duration of lifestyle counseling was brief (figure 1). In 7% of the visits lifestyle counseling lasted a quarter of the visit or more, and in 1% this was half the visit or more. The duration of the visit tended to be longer when lifestyle was discussed than when it was not discussed (mean duration ± SD: 10.4 ± 4.3 minutes vs 9.5 ± 4.8 minutes; P = 0.57).

Bottom Line: Supporting factors were not discussed at all.In 40% of the hypertension-related visits lifestyle topics were discussed.However, both the frequency and quality of lifestyle advice can be improved.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: RIVM (National Institute of Public Health and the Environment), Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. ivon.milder@rivm.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: The general practitioner (GP) can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle, which is especially relevant in people with an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases due to hypertension. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency and content of lifestyle counseling about weight loss, nutrition, physical activity, and smoking by GPs in hypertension-related visits. A distinction was made between the assessment of lifestyle (gathering information or measuring weight or waist circumference) and giving lifestyle advice (giving a specific advice to change the patient's behavior or referring the patient to other sources of information or other health professionals).

Methods: For this study, we observed 212 video recordings of hypertension-related visits collected within the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice in 2000/2001.

Results: The mean duration of visits was 9.8 minutes (range 2.5 to 30 minutes). In 40% of the visits lifestyle was discussed (n = 84), but in 81% of these visits this discussion lasted shorter than a quarter of the visit. An assessment of lifestyle was made in 77 visits (36%), most commonly regarding body weight and nutrition. In most cases the patient initiated the discussion about nutrition and physical activity, whereas the assessment of weight and smoking status was mostly initiated by the GP. In 35 visits (17%) the GP gave lifestyle advice, but in only one fifth of these visits the patient's motivation or perceived barriers for changing behavior were assessed. Supporting factors were not discussed at all.

Conclusion: In 40% of the hypertension-related visits lifestyle topics were discussed. However, both the frequency and quality of lifestyle advice can be improved.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus