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Links from complex spikes to local plasticity and motor learning in the cerebellum of awake-behaving monkeys.

Medina JF, Lisberger SG - Nat. Neurosci. (2008)

Bottom Line: The hypothesis of cerebellar learning proposes that complex spikes in Purkinje cells engage mechanisms of plasticity in the cerebellar cortex; in turn, changes in the cerebellum depress the simple-spike response of Purkinje cells to a given stimulus and cause the adaptive modification of a motor behavior.Many elements of this hypothesis have been supported by prior experiments, and correlations have been found [corrected] between complex spikes, simple-spike plasticity and behavior [corrected] during the learning process.We carried out a trial-by-trial analysis of Purkinje cell responses in awake-behaving monkeys and found evidence for a causal role for complex spikes in the induction of cerebellar plasticity during a simple motor learning task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 3720 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

ABSTRACT
The hypothesis of cerebellar learning proposes that complex spikes in Purkinje cells engage mechanisms of plasticity in the cerebellar cortex; in turn, changes in the cerebellum depress the simple-spike response of Purkinje cells to a given stimulus and cause the adaptive modification of a motor behavior. Many elements of this hypothesis have been supported by prior experiments, and correlations have been found [corrected] between complex spikes, simple-spike plasticity and behavior [corrected] during the learning process. We carried out a trial-by-trial analysis of Purkinje cell responses in awake-behaving monkeys and found evidence for a causal role for complex spikes in the induction of cerebellar plasticity during a simple motor learning task. We found that the presence of a complex spike on one learning trial was linked to a substantial depression of simple-spike responses on the subsequent trial, at a time when behavioral learning was expressed.

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Quantitative relationship between complex spike probability in learning trials and learned changes in simple spike activity in probe trials. Each point plots the results of one learning experiment on one Purkinje cell and shows averages across all the trials in the learning block. Analysis intervals for the complex spike probability and the learned change in simple spike firing are indicated in Figure 3. Filled and open symbols indicate data from group 1 (n=11) and group 2 (n=6) Purkinje cells; blue and red symbols indicate learning in the on-direction and off-direction of the Purkinje cell under study.
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Figure 4: Quantitative relationship between complex spike probability in learning trials and learned changes in simple spike activity in probe trials. Each point plots the results of one learning experiment on one Purkinje cell and shows averages across all the trials in the learning block. Analysis intervals for the complex spike probability and the learned change in simple spike firing are indicated in Figure 3. Filled and open symbols indicate data from group 1 (n=11) and group 2 (n=6) Purkinje cells; blue and red symbols indicate learning in the on-direction and off-direction of the Purkinje cell under study.

Mentions: Across Purkinje cells, the probability of a complex spike during learning was a good predictor of the size and direction of the learned change in simple spike firing in each individual Purkinje cell (Fig. 4). For learning in the off-direction, group 1 Purkinje cells had a high probability of emitting a complex spike in the learning trials and showed large learned decreases in simple spike firing in probe trials (filled red circles); group 2 Purkinje cells were less likely to emit a complex spike during learning and showed learned increases, rather than decreases, in simple spike firing (open red circles). For learning in the on-direction, neither group of Purkinje cells emitted very many complex spikes in the learning trials and both showed learned increases in simple spike firing during the probe trials (open and filled blue circles). Averaging the response measures in bins (black symbols) indicates that the probability of a complex spike had to at least triple from baseline to be consistently associated with a learned decrease in simple spike response.


Links from complex spikes to local plasticity and motor learning in the cerebellum of awake-behaving monkeys.

Medina JF, Lisberger SG - Nat. Neurosci. (2008)

Quantitative relationship between complex spike probability in learning trials and learned changes in simple spike activity in probe trials. Each point plots the results of one learning experiment on one Purkinje cell and shows averages across all the trials in the learning block. Analysis intervals for the complex spike probability and the learned change in simple spike firing are indicated in Figure 3. Filled and open symbols indicate data from group 1 (n=11) and group 2 (n=6) Purkinje cells; blue and red symbols indicate learning in the on-direction and off-direction of the Purkinje cell under study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2577564&req=5

Figure 4: Quantitative relationship between complex spike probability in learning trials and learned changes in simple spike activity in probe trials. Each point plots the results of one learning experiment on one Purkinje cell and shows averages across all the trials in the learning block. Analysis intervals for the complex spike probability and the learned change in simple spike firing are indicated in Figure 3. Filled and open symbols indicate data from group 1 (n=11) and group 2 (n=6) Purkinje cells; blue and red symbols indicate learning in the on-direction and off-direction of the Purkinje cell under study.
Mentions: Across Purkinje cells, the probability of a complex spike during learning was a good predictor of the size and direction of the learned change in simple spike firing in each individual Purkinje cell (Fig. 4). For learning in the off-direction, group 1 Purkinje cells had a high probability of emitting a complex spike in the learning trials and showed large learned decreases in simple spike firing in probe trials (filled red circles); group 2 Purkinje cells were less likely to emit a complex spike during learning and showed learned increases, rather than decreases, in simple spike firing (open red circles). For learning in the on-direction, neither group of Purkinje cells emitted very many complex spikes in the learning trials and both showed learned increases in simple spike firing during the probe trials (open and filled blue circles). Averaging the response measures in bins (black symbols) indicates that the probability of a complex spike had to at least triple from baseline to be consistently associated with a learned decrease in simple spike response.

Bottom Line: The hypothesis of cerebellar learning proposes that complex spikes in Purkinje cells engage mechanisms of plasticity in the cerebellar cortex; in turn, changes in the cerebellum depress the simple-spike response of Purkinje cells to a given stimulus and cause the adaptive modification of a motor behavior.Many elements of this hypothesis have been supported by prior experiments, and correlations have been found [corrected] between complex spikes, simple-spike plasticity and behavior [corrected] during the learning process.We carried out a trial-by-trial analysis of Purkinje cell responses in awake-behaving monkeys and found evidence for a causal role for complex spikes in the induction of cerebellar plasticity during a simple motor learning task.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 3720 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

ABSTRACT
The hypothesis of cerebellar learning proposes that complex spikes in Purkinje cells engage mechanisms of plasticity in the cerebellar cortex; in turn, changes in the cerebellum depress the simple-spike response of Purkinje cells to a given stimulus and cause the adaptive modification of a motor behavior. Many elements of this hypothesis have been supported by prior experiments, and correlations have been found [corrected] between complex spikes, simple-spike plasticity and behavior [corrected] during the learning process. We carried out a trial-by-trial analysis of Purkinje cell responses in awake-behaving monkeys and found evidence for a causal role for complex spikes in the induction of cerebellar plasticity during a simple motor learning task. We found that the presence of a complex spike on one learning trial was linked to a substantial depression of simple-spike responses on the subsequent trial, at a time when behavioral learning was expressed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus