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Disruption of learned timing in P/Q calcium channel mutants.

Katoh A, Chapman PJ, Raymond JL - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: To optimize motor performance, both the amplitude and temporal properties of movements should be modifiable by motor learning.Here we report that the modification of movement timing is highly dependent on signaling through P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels.The results thus demonstrate a distinction between the molecular signaling pathways regulating the timing versus amplitude of movements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
To optimize motor performance, both the amplitude and temporal properties of movements should be modifiable by motor learning. Here we report that the modification of movement timing is highly dependent on signaling through P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. Two lines of mutant mice heterozygous for P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels exhibited impaired plasticity of eye movement timing, but relatively intact plasticity of movement amplitude during motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex. The results thus demonstrate a distinction between the molecular signaling pathways regulating the timing versus amplitude of movements.

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Working model of the multiple, molecularly-distinct components of motor learning in the VOR.The ordinate indicates changes in VOR gain and the abscissa indicates changes in VOR phase. A P/Q-dependent component of learning supports gain decreases linked with phase leads or gain increases linked with phase lags (red arrows). A CaMKIV-dependent component supports gain increases (green arrow). A CaMKIV- and P/Q-independent component supports gain decreases (blue arrows). The CaMKIV-dependent component (green arrows) is recruited more effectively by high-frequency training stimuli, whereas the P/Q-dependent component (red arrows) is recruited more effectively by low-frequency training stimuli.
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pone-0003635-g005: Working model of the multiple, molecularly-distinct components of motor learning in the VOR.The ordinate indicates changes in VOR gain and the abscissa indicates changes in VOR phase. A P/Q-dependent component of learning supports gain decreases linked with phase leads or gain increases linked with phase lags (red arrows). A CaMKIV-dependent component supports gain increases (green arrow). A CaMKIV- and P/Q-independent component supports gain decreases (blue arrows). The CaMKIV-dependent component (green arrows) is recruited more effectively by high-frequency training stimuli, whereas the P/Q-dependent component (red arrows) is recruited more effectively by low-frequency training stimuli.

Mentions: Fig. 5 presents a working model of the components of cerebellum-dependent learning, and their recruitment during high- and low-frequency training, based on current and previous results. There are at least three components of learning: a CaMKIV-dependent component (green arrows in Fig. 5), which supports gain increases (possibly LTD of the parallel fiber–Purkinje cell synapses); a P/Q-dependent component (red arrows), which supports gain decreases linked with phase leads or gain increases linked with phase lags; and a CaMKIV- and P/Q-independent component (blue arrows), which supports gain decreases. The CaMKIV-dependent component (green arrows) is recruited more effectively by high-frequency training stimuli since the CaMKIV knockout mice showed the gain increase deficits only for high-frequency training [17], whereas the P/Q-dependent component (red arrows) is recruited more effectively by low-frequency training.


Disruption of learned timing in P/Q calcium channel mutants.

Katoh A, Chapman PJ, Raymond JL - PLoS ONE (2008)

Working model of the multiple, molecularly-distinct components of motor learning in the VOR.The ordinate indicates changes in VOR gain and the abscissa indicates changes in VOR phase. A P/Q-dependent component of learning supports gain decreases linked with phase leads or gain increases linked with phase lags (red arrows). A CaMKIV-dependent component supports gain increases (green arrow). A CaMKIV- and P/Q-independent component supports gain decreases (blue arrows). The CaMKIV-dependent component (green arrows) is recruited more effectively by high-frequency training stimuli, whereas the P/Q-dependent component (red arrows) is recruited more effectively by low-frequency training stimuli.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572847&req=5

pone-0003635-g005: Working model of the multiple, molecularly-distinct components of motor learning in the VOR.The ordinate indicates changes in VOR gain and the abscissa indicates changes in VOR phase. A P/Q-dependent component of learning supports gain decreases linked with phase leads or gain increases linked with phase lags (red arrows). A CaMKIV-dependent component supports gain increases (green arrow). A CaMKIV- and P/Q-independent component supports gain decreases (blue arrows). The CaMKIV-dependent component (green arrows) is recruited more effectively by high-frequency training stimuli, whereas the P/Q-dependent component (red arrows) is recruited more effectively by low-frequency training stimuli.
Mentions: Fig. 5 presents a working model of the components of cerebellum-dependent learning, and their recruitment during high- and low-frequency training, based on current and previous results. There are at least three components of learning: a CaMKIV-dependent component (green arrows in Fig. 5), which supports gain increases (possibly LTD of the parallel fiber–Purkinje cell synapses); a P/Q-dependent component (red arrows), which supports gain decreases linked with phase leads or gain increases linked with phase lags; and a CaMKIV- and P/Q-independent component (blue arrows), which supports gain decreases. The CaMKIV-dependent component (green arrows) is recruited more effectively by high-frequency training stimuli since the CaMKIV knockout mice showed the gain increase deficits only for high-frequency training [17], whereas the P/Q-dependent component (red arrows) is recruited more effectively by low-frequency training.

Bottom Line: To optimize motor performance, both the amplitude and temporal properties of movements should be modifiable by motor learning.Here we report that the modification of movement timing is highly dependent on signaling through P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels.The results thus demonstrate a distinction between the molecular signaling pathways regulating the timing versus amplitude of movements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
To optimize motor performance, both the amplitude and temporal properties of movements should be modifiable by motor learning. Here we report that the modification of movement timing is highly dependent on signaling through P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. Two lines of mutant mice heterozygous for P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels exhibited impaired plasticity of eye movement timing, but relatively intact plasticity of movement amplitude during motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex. The results thus demonstrate a distinction between the molecular signaling pathways regulating the timing versus amplitude of movements.

Show MeSH