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Disruption of learned timing in P/Q calcium channel mutants.

Katoh A, Chapman PJ, Raymond JL - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: To optimize motor performance, both the amplitude and temporal properties of movements should be modifiable by motor learning.Here we report that the modification of movement timing is highly dependent on signaling through P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels.The results thus demonstrate a distinction between the molecular signaling pathways regulating the timing versus amplitude of movements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
To optimize motor performance, both the amplitude and temporal properties of movements should be modifiable by motor learning. Here we report that the modification of movement timing is highly dependent on signaling through P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. Two lines of mutant mice heterozygous for P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels exhibited impaired plasticity of eye movement timing, but relatively intact plasticity of movement amplitude during motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex. The results thus demonstrate a distinction between the molecular signaling pathways regulating the timing versus amplitude of movements.

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The gain (A, C) and phase (B, D) of the tracking eye movements relative to head movement made in the presence of each visual-vestibular training stimulus at the start (A, B) and end (C, D) of training.Letters correspond to the 1 Hz training paradigms described in Table 1. The tracking eye movements of the heterozygous leaner (blue) and hemizygous α1A mice (red) during training were not significantly different from wild-type mice (black).
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pone-0003635-g003: The gain (A, C) and phase (B, D) of the tracking eye movements relative to head movement made in the presence of each visual-vestibular training stimulus at the start (A, B) and end (C, D) of training.Letters correspond to the 1 Hz training paradigms described in Table 1. The tracking eye movements of the heterozygous leaner (blue) and hemizygous α1A mice (red) during training were not significantly different from wild-type mice (black).

Mentions: Letters a–j for each training paradigm correspond to labels in Figs. 1–3 and Fig. S2. The notation describing each training paradigm denotes the eye movement gain and phase (relative to head motion) that would stabilize the image of the moving visual stimulus on the retina. x1/180°lead training is often referred to as x(−1) training.


Disruption of learned timing in P/Q calcium channel mutants.

Katoh A, Chapman PJ, Raymond JL - PLoS ONE (2008)

The gain (A, C) and phase (B, D) of the tracking eye movements relative to head movement made in the presence of each visual-vestibular training stimulus at the start (A, B) and end (C, D) of training.Letters correspond to the 1 Hz training paradigms described in Table 1. The tracking eye movements of the heterozygous leaner (blue) and hemizygous α1A mice (red) during training were not significantly different from wild-type mice (black).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572847&req=5

pone-0003635-g003: The gain (A, C) and phase (B, D) of the tracking eye movements relative to head movement made in the presence of each visual-vestibular training stimulus at the start (A, B) and end (C, D) of training.Letters correspond to the 1 Hz training paradigms described in Table 1. The tracking eye movements of the heterozygous leaner (blue) and hemizygous α1A mice (red) during training were not significantly different from wild-type mice (black).
Mentions: Letters a–j for each training paradigm correspond to labels in Figs. 1–3 and Fig. S2. The notation describing each training paradigm denotes the eye movement gain and phase (relative to head motion) that would stabilize the image of the moving visual stimulus on the retina. x1/180°lead training is often referred to as x(−1) training.

Bottom Line: To optimize motor performance, both the amplitude and temporal properties of movements should be modifiable by motor learning.Here we report that the modification of movement timing is highly dependent on signaling through P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels.The results thus demonstrate a distinction between the molecular signaling pathways regulating the timing versus amplitude of movements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
To optimize motor performance, both the amplitude and temporal properties of movements should be modifiable by motor learning. Here we report that the modification of movement timing is highly dependent on signaling through P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. Two lines of mutant mice heterozygous for P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels exhibited impaired plasticity of eye movement timing, but relatively intact plasticity of movement amplitude during motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex. The results thus demonstrate a distinction between the molecular signaling pathways regulating the timing versus amplitude of movements.

Show MeSH