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Pre-operative diagnosis of an unusual complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm on multidetector computed tomography: a case report.

Jakanani GC, Chong PL - Cases J (2008)

Bottom Line: Spontaneous fistulation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) into the inferior vena cava (IVC) is an unusual and infrequently encountered complication in clinical practice.In the majority of cases, it is a diagnosis made on the operating table, during surgical repair of AAA.Preoperative diagnosis of this rare complication is important as it allows appropriate anaesthetic and surgical planning thereby reducing morbidity and mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Infirmary Square, Leicester, LE1 5WW, UK. jakanani@doctors.org.uk.

ABSTRACT
Spontaneous fistulation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) into the inferior vena cava (IVC) is an unusual and infrequently encountered complication in clinical practice. In the majority of cases, it is a diagnosis made on the operating table, during surgical repair of AAA. We report a patient with an aortocaval fistula diagnosed preoperatively on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Preoperative diagnosis of this rare complication is important as it allows appropriate anaesthetic and surgical planning thereby reducing morbidity and mortality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

AXR shows curvilinear calcification in wall of AAA. The psoas shadow is preserved.
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Figure 1: AXR shows curvilinear calcification in wall of AAA. The psoas shadow is preserved.

Mentions: On examination he had a palpable abdominal aneurysm but was haemodynamically stable. Plain abdominal X-ray showed curvilinear wall calcification in a AAA (Fig. 1). A CT scan was performed to exclude a leaking aneurysm and revealed a 7 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with fistulation into the inferior vena cava (Fig. 2 and Fig. 3).


Pre-operative diagnosis of an unusual complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm on multidetector computed tomography: a case report.

Jakanani GC, Chong PL - Cases J (2008)

AXR shows curvilinear calcification in wall of AAA. The psoas shadow is preserved.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572602&req=5

Figure 1: AXR shows curvilinear calcification in wall of AAA. The psoas shadow is preserved.
Mentions: On examination he had a palpable abdominal aneurysm but was haemodynamically stable. Plain abdominal X-ray showed curvilinear wall calcification in a AAA (Fig. 1). A CT scan was performed to exclude a leaking aneurysm and revealed a 7 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with fistulation into the inferior vena cava (Fig. 2 and Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Spontaneous fistulation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) into the inferior vena cava (IVC) is an unusual and infrequently encountered complication in clinical practice.In the majority of cases, it is a diagnosis made on the operating table, during surgical repair of AAA.Preoperative diagnosis of this rare complication is important as it allows appropriate anaesthetic and surgical planning thereby reducing morbidity and mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Infirmary Square, Leicester, LE1 5WW, UK. jakanani@doctors.org.uk.

ABSTRACT
Spontaneous fistulation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) into the inferior vena cava (IVC) is an unusual and infrequently encountered complication in clinical practice. In the majority of cases, it is a diagnosis made on the operating table, during surgical repair of AAA. We report a patient with an aortocaval fistula diagnosed preoperatively on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Preoperative diagnosis of this rare complication is important as it allows appropriate anaesthetic and surgical planning thereby reducing morbidity and mortality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus