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Response inhibition is linked to emotional devaluation: behavioural and electrophysiological evidence.

Kiss M, Raymond JE, Westoby N, Nobre AC, Eimer M - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Bottom Line: Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face.Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli.To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Birkbeck College, University of London London, UK. m.kiss@bbk.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
To study links between the inhibition of motor responses and emotional evaluation, we combined electrophysiological measures of prefrontal response inhibition with behavioural measures of affective evaluation. Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face. Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli. To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness. Nogo N2 amplitudes were larger in response to low-rated as compared to high-rated faces, demonstrating that trial-by-trial variations in the efficiency of response inhibition triggered by Nogo faces, as measured by the Nogo N2 component, co-vary with their subsequent affective evaluation. These results suggest close links between inhibitory processes in top-down motor control and emotional responses.

No MeSH data available.


Left panels show difference waveforms obtained by subtracting Go trials from Nogo trials, separately for faces that subsequently received a high (black line) or low (dark cyan line) trustworthiness rating. Right panels show topographical maps of Nogo–Go difference waveforms obtained in the Nogo N2 time window (250–350 ms post-stimulus) for faces that were later judged as low or high in their trustworthiness. Bottom right panel: Scalp topography of the difference of the Nogo N2 in the same time window as a function of subsequent trustworthiness ratings, computed by subtracting Nogo–Go difference waveforms for high-rated faces from Nogo–Go difference waveforms for low-rated faces.
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Figure 4: Left panels show difference waveforms obtained by subtracting Go trials from Nogo trials, separately for faces that subsequently received a high (black line) or low (dark cyan line) trustworthiness rating. Right panels show topographical maps of Nogo–Go difference waveforms obtained in the Nogo N2 time window (250–350 ms post-stimulus) for faces that were later judged as low or high in their trustworthiness. Bottom right panel: Scalp topography of the difference of the Nogo N2 in the same time window as a function of subsequent trustworthiness ratings, computed by subtracting Nogo–Go difference waveforms for high-rated faces from Nogo–Go difference waveforms for low-rated faces.

Mentions: Figure 3 shows ERPs obtained at anterior, central and posterior electrodes in response to Go and Nogo faces (collapsed across Asian and Caucasian faces), separately for faces that were later rated as more trustworthy (ratings 3 and 4, right panel) or less trustworthy (ratings 1 and 2, left panel). The Nogo–Go difference waves obtained at anterior, central, and posterior electrodes for low-rated and high-rated faces are shown in Figure 4 (left panel). Figure 4 also shows scalp distribution maps of the Nogo–Go difference in the N2 time window (250–350 ms post-stimulus) as a function of subsequent trustworthiness ratings (right top panels), as well as the topography of the difference of Nogo N2 amplitudes between low-rated and high-rated faces (right bottom panel). These figures show an enhanced anterior N2 in response to Nogo faces as compared to Go faces, as expected. Critically, the amplitude of this Nogo N2 appears larger in response to faces that had later received a low trustworthiness rating than for faces that were rated more positively. This modulation of the Nogo N2 as a function of subsequent ratings shows a distinct frontal topography (Figure 4, right panel).


Response inhibition is linked to emotional devaluation: behavioural and electrophysiological evidence.

Kiss M, Raymond JE, Westoby N, Nobre AC, Eimer M - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Left panels show difference waveforms obtained by subtracting Go trials from Nogo trials, separately for faces that subsequently received a high (black line) or low (dark cyan line) trustworthiness rating. Right panels show topographical maps of Nogo–Go difference waveforms obtained in the Nogo N2 time window (250–350 ms post-stimulus) for faces that were later judged as low or high in their trustworthiness. Bottom right panel: Scalp topography of the difference of the Nogo N2 in the same time window as a function of subsequent trustworthiness ratings, computed by subtracting Nogo–Go difference waveforms for high-rated faces from Nogo–Go difference waveforms for low-rated faces.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572209&req=5

Figure 4: Left panels show difference waveforms obtained by subtracting Go trials from Nogo trials, separately for faces that subsequently received a high (black line) or low (dark cyan line) trustworthiness rating. Right panels show topographical maps of Nogo–Go difference waveforms obtained in the Nogo N2 time window (250–350 ms post-stimulus) for faces that were later judged as low or high in their trustworthiness. Bottom right panel: Scalp topography of the difference of the Nogo N2 in the same time window as a function of subsequent trustworthiness ratings, computed by subtracting Nogo–Go difference waveforms for high-rated faces from Nogo–Go difference waveforms for low-rated faces.
Mentions: Figure 3 shows ERPs obtained at anterior, central and posterior electrodes in response to Go and Nogo faces (collapsed across Asian and Caucasian faces), separately for faces that were later rated as more trustworthy (ratings 3 and 4, right panel) or less trustworthy (ratings 1 and 2, left panel). The Nogo–Go difference waves obtained at anterior, central, and posterior electrodes for low-rated and high-rated faces are shown in Figure 4 (left panel). Figure 4 also shows scalp distribution maps of the Nogo–Go difference in the N2 time window (250–350 ms post-stimulus) as a function of subsequent trustworthiness ratings (right top panels), as well as the topography of the difference of Nogo N2 amplitudes between low-rated and high-rated faces (right bottom panel). These figures show an enhanced anterior N2 in response to Nogo faces as compared to Go faces, as expected. Critically, the amplitude of this Nogo N2 appears larger in response to faces that had later received a low trustworthiness rating than for faces that were rated more positively. This modulation of the Nogo N2 as a function of subsequent ratings shows a distinct frontal topography (Figure 4, right panel).

Bottom Line: Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face.Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli.To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Birkbeck College, University of London London, UK. m.kiss@bbk.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
To study links between the inhibition of motor responses and emotional evaluation, we combined electrophysiological measures of prefrontal response inhibition with behavioural measures of affective evaluation. Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face. Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli. To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness. Nogo N2 amplitudes were larger in response to low-rated as compared to high-rated faces, demonstrating that trial-by-trial variations in the efficiency of response inhibition triggered by Nogo faces, as measured by the Nogo N2 component, co-vary with their subsequent affective evaluation. These results suggest close links between inhibitory processes in top-down motor control and emotional responses.

No MeSH data available.