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Response inhibition is linked to emotional devaluation: behavioural and electrophysiological evidence.

Kiss M, Raymond JE, Westoby N, Nobre AC, Eimer M - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Bottom Line: Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face.Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli.To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Birkbeck College, University of London London, UK. m.kiss@bbk.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
To study links between the inhibition of motor responses and emotional evaluation, we combined electrophysiological measures of prefrontal response inhibition with behavioural measures of affective evaluation. Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face. Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli. To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness. Nogo N2 amplitudes were larger in response to low-rated as compared to high-rated faces, demonstrating that trial-by-trial variations in the efficiency of response inhibition triggered by Nogo faces, as measured by the Nogo N2 component, co-vary with their subsequent affective evaluation. These results suggest close links between inhibitory processes in top-down motor control and emotional responses.

No MeSH data available.


Trustworthiness ratings obtained for faces previously presented in Go and Nogo trials. Error bars represent standard errors of the mean.
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Figure 2: Trustworthiness ratings obtained for faces previously presented in Go and Nogo trials. Error bars represent standard errors of the mean.

Mentions: The overall mean RT in correct Go trials was 489 ms (SD = 57). False Alarms occurred on 3.3% of all Nogo trials, and participants missed 0.9% of all responses on Go trials. Mean trustworthiness ratings were calculated for each participant, for each combination of response assignment (rated face previously shown as Go versus Nogo stimulus), face race, and face gender, and were then entered into a repeated-measures ANOVA. Crucially, there was a main effect of response assignment, F(1,13) = 9.2, p < 0.01, showing that faces that had previously been presented as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than faces that had been shown as Go stimuli (2.54 versus 2.61; see Figure 2). Response assignment did not interact significantly with either race or gender (both F < 2.4, both p > 0.145)3.


Response inhibition is linked to emotional devaluation: behavioural and electrophysiological evidence.

Kiss M, Raymond JE, Westoby N, Nobre AC, Eimer M - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Trustworthiness ratings obtained for faces previously presented in Go and Nogo trials. Error bars represent standard errors of the mean.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572209&req=5

Figure 2: Trustworthiness ratings obtained for faces previously presented in Go and Nogo trials. Error bars represent standard errors of the mean.
Mentions: The overall mean RT in correct Go trials was 489 ms (SD = 57). False Alarms occurred on 3.3% of all Nogo trials, and participants missed 0.9% of all responses on Go trials. Mean trustworthiness ratings were calculated for each participant, for each combination of response assignment (rated face previously shown as Go versus Nogo stimulus), face race, and face gender, and were then entered into a repeated-measures ANOVA. Crucially, there was a main effect of response assignment, F(1,13) = 9.2, p < 0.01, showing that faces that had previously been presented as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than faces that had been shown as Go stimuli (2.54 versus 2.61; see Figure 2). Response assignment did not interact significantly with either race or gender (both F < 2.4, both p > 0.145)3.

Bottom Line: Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face.Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli.To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Birkbeck College, University of London London, UK. m.kiss@bbk.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
To study links between the inhibition of motor responses and emotional evaluation, we combined electrophysiological measures of prefrontal response inhibition with behavioural measures of affective evaluation. Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face. Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli. To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness. Nogo N2 amplitudes were larger in response to low-rated as compared to high-rated faces, demonstrating that trial-by-trial variations in the efficiency of response inhibition triggered by Nogo faces, as measured by the Nogo N2 component, co-vary with their subsequent affective evaluation. These results suggest close links between inhibitory processes in top-down motor control and emotional responses.

No MeSH data available.