Limits...
Response inhibition is linked to emotional devaluation: behavioural and electrophysiological evidence.

Kiss M, Raymond JE, Westoby N, Nobre AC, Eimer M - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Bottom Line: Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face.Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli.To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Birkbeck College, University of London London, UK. m.kiss@bbk.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
To study links between the inhibition of motor responses and emotional evaluation, we combined electrophysiological measures of prefrontal response inhibition with behavioural measures of affective evaluation. Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face. Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli. To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness. Nogo N2 amplitudes were larger in response to low-rated as compared to high-rated faces, demonstrating that trial-by-trial variations in the efficiency of response inhibition triggered by Nogo faces, as measured by the Nogo N2 component, co-vary with their subsequent affective evaluation. These results suggest close links between inhibitory processes in top-down motor control and emotional responses.

No MeSH data available.


Example of trial sequence for the Go–Nogo task (top panel) and the evaluation task (bottom panel).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572209&req=5

Figure 1: Example of trial sequence for the Go–Nogo task (top panel) and the evaluation task (bottom panel).

Mentions: In each block, participants performed two successive tasks (Go–Nogo and evaluation), with 12 Go–Nogo trials followed by 12 evaluation trials (see Figure 1). In the Go–Nogo task, participants were required to press the space bar with both index fingers as fast as possible whenever the displayed face was Asian (or Caucasian, in different blocks) and refrain from responding otherwise. Each face was presented for 300 ms, followed by a 1200-ms empty interval until the next face appeared. In the subsequent evaluation task, participants had to judge the trustworthiness of the same 12 faces on a 4-point scale from 1 (‘not at all trustworthy’) to 4 (‘very trustworthy’) by pressing the corresponding numeric key on a standard keyboard with the index or middle finger of the left or right hand. Each face was presented for 300 ms, followed by a 2700-ms blank interval. The order in which individual faces were presented for evaluation was identical to that of the preceding Go–Nogo task. Prior to each run of 12 trials for the Go–Nogo and evaluation tasks, a brief instruction screen appeared, reminding participants of the task to be performed. After the final trial of the Go–Nogo task, a feedback screen informed participants about their average response time (RT) and accuracy for this block. Participants then started the next run of 12 evaluation trials by pressing a key. To ensure that the interval between seeing a face for the first time in the Go–Nogo task and seeing it again for rating was minimal, they were encouraged to start the evaluation task immediately.


Response inhibition is linked to emotional devaluation: behavioural and electrophysiological evidence.

Kiss M, Raymond JE, Westoby N, Nobre AC, Eimer M - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Example of trial sequence for the Go–Nogo task (top panel) and the evaluation task (bottom panel).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572209&req=5

Figure 1: Example of trial sequence for the Go–Nogo task (top panel) and the evaluation task (bottom panel).
Mentions: In each block, participants performed two successive tasks (Go–Nogo and evaluation), with 12 Go–Nogo trials followed by 12 evaluation trials (see Figure 1). In the Go–Nogo task, participants were required to press the space bar with both index fingers as fast as possible whenever the displayed face was Asian (or Caucasian, in different blocks) and refrain from responding otherwise. Each face was presented for 300 ms, followed by a 1200-ms empty interval until the next face appeared. In the subsequent evaluation task, participants had to judge the trustworthiness of the same 12 faces on a 4-point scale from 1 (‘not at all trustworthy’) to 4 (‘very trustworthy’) by pressing the corresponding numeric key on a standard keyboard with the index or middle finger of the left or right hand. Each face was presented for 300 ms, followed by a 2700-ms blank interval. The order in which individual faces were presented for evaluation was identical to that of the preceding Go–Nogo task. Prior to each run of 12 trials for the Go–Nogo and evaluation tasks, a brief instruction screen appeared, reminding participants of the task to be performed. After the final trial of the Go–Nogo task, a feedback screen informed participants about their average response time (RT) and accuracy for this block. Participants then started the next run of 12 evaluation trials by pressing a key. To ensure that the interval between seeing a face for the first time in the Go–Nogo task and seeing it again for rating was minimal, they were encouraged to start the evaluation task immediately.

Bottom Line: Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face.Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli.To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Birkbeck College, University of London London, UK. m.kiss@bbk.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
To study links between the inhibition of motor responses and emotional evaluation, we combined electrophysiological measures of prefrontal response inhibition with behavioural measures of affective evaluation. Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face. Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli. To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness. Nogo N2 amplitudes were larger in response to low-rated as compared to high-rated faces, demonstrating that trial-by-trial variations in the efficiency of response inhibition triggered by Nogo faces, as measured by the Nogo N2 component, co-vary with their subsequent affective evaluation. These results suggest close links between inhibitory processes in top-down motor control and emotional responses.

No MeSH data available.