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Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met and blood glucose: a synergistic effect on memory.

Raz N, Dahle CL, Rodrigue KM, Kennedy KM, Land SJ, Jacobs BS - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Bottom Line: Although several genetic variants and vascular risk factors have been linked to mnemonic performance in general and age differences therein, it is unknown whether and how they modify age-related memory declines.The effect on associative memory was stronger than on free recall.These findings indicate that even low-level vascular risk can produce negative cognitive effects in genetically susceptible individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Wayne State University Detroit, MI 48202, USA. nraz@wayne.edu

ABSTRACT
Age-related declines in episodic memory performance are frequently reported, but their mechanisms remain poorly understood. Although several genetic variants and vascular risk factors have been linked to mnemonic performance in general and age differences therein, it is unknown whether and how they modify age-related memory declines. To address that question, we investigated the effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism that affects secretion of BDNF, and fasting blood glucose level (a vascular risk factor) on episodic memory in a sample of healthy volunteers (age 19-77). We found that advanced age and high-normal blood glucose levels were associated with reduced recognition memory for name-face associations and poorer prose recall. However, elevated blood glucose predicted lower memory scores only in carriers of the BDNF 66Met allele. The effect on associative memory was stronger than on free recall. These findings indicate that even low-level vascular risk can produce negative cognitive effects in genetically susceptible individuals. Alleviation of treatable vascular risks in such persons may have a positive effect on age-related cognitive declines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Logical Memory (story recall) and blood glucose modified by BDNF Val66Met genotype. BDNF Val66Met Met carriers (triangles, broken regression line) are compared to BDNF Val homozygotes (circles, solid regression line). (A) Immediate recall. (B) Delayed recall.
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Figure 2: Logical Memory (story recall) and blood glucose modified by BDNF Val66Met genotype. BDNF Val66Met Met carriers (triangles, broken regression line) are compared to BDNF Val homozygotes (circles, solid regression line). (A) Immediate recall. (B) Delayed recall.

Mentions: The main effect of age reflected better performance by younger participants. The magnitude of age differences in story recall was smaller than in associative memory: Z* = 2.32, p < 0.05 for delayed, and Z* = 2.67, p < 0.01 for immediate recall. The relation between blood glucose levels and delayed story recall was also weaker than for delayed associative memory: Z* = 2.03, p < 0.05. The difference for immediate memory was not significant, albeit in the same direction: Z* = 1.16, ns. The modifying influence of BDNF Val66Met can be seen in Figure 2. Among BDNF Met carriers, higher glucose levels were associated with lower LM scores: r = −.36, p < 0.05 for delayed recall and a trend r = −.27, p < 0.09 for immediate recall. For BDNF Val homozygotes, no such associations were observed: r = −.06 for immediate and r = 0.00 for delayed scores.


Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met and blood glucose: a synergistic effect on memory.

Raz N, Dahle CL, Rodrigue KM, Kennedy KM, Land SJ, Jacobs BS - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Logical Memory (story recall) and blood glucose modified by BDNF Val66Met genotype. BDNF Val66Met Met carriers (triangles, broken regression line) are compared to BDNF Val homozygotes (circles, solid regression line). (A) Immediate recall. (B) Delayed recall.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572208&req=5

Figure 2: Logical Memory (story recall) and blood glucose modified by BDNF Val66Met genotype. BDNF Val66Met Met carriers (triangles, broken regression line) are compared to BDNF Val homozygotes (circles, solid regression line). (A) Immediate recall. (B) Delayed recall.
Mentions: The main effect of age reflected better performance by younger participants. The magnitude of age differences in story recall was smaller than in associative memory: Z* = 2.32, p < 0.05 for delayed, and Z* = 2.67, p < 0.01 for immediate recall. The relation between blood glucose levels and delayed story recall was also weaker than for delayed associative memory: Z* = 2.03, p < 0.05. The difference for immediate memory was not significant, albeit in the same direction: Z* = 1.16, ns. The modifying influence of BDNF Val66Met can be seen in Figure 2. Among BDNF Met carriers, higher glucose levels were associated with lower LM scores: r = −.36, p < 0.05 for delayed recall and a trend r = −.27, p < 0.09 for immediate recall. For BDNF Val homozygotes, no such associations were observed: r = −.06 for immediate and r = 0.00 for delayed scores.

Bottom Line: Although several genetic variants and vascular risk factors have been linked to mnemonic performance in general and age differences therein, it is unknown whether and how they modify age-related memory declines.The effect on associative memory was stronger than on free recall.These findings indicate that even low-level vascular risk can produce negative cognitive effects in genetically susceptible individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Wayne State University Detroit, MI 48202, USA. nraz@wayne.edu

ABSTRACT
Age-related declines in episodic memory performance are frequently reported, but their mechanisms remain poorly understood. Although several genetic variants and vascular risk factors have been linked to mnemonic performance in general and age differences therein, it is unknown whether and how they modify age-related memory declines. To address that question, we investigated the effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism that affects secretion of BDNF, and fasting blood glucose level (a vascular risk factor) on episodic memory in a sample of healthy volunteers (age 19-77). We found that advanced age and high-normal blood glucose levels were associated with reduced recognition memory for name-face associations and poorer prose recall. However, elevated blood glucose predicted lower memory scores only in carriers of the BDNF 66Met allele. The effect on associative memory was stronger than on free recall. These findings indicate that even low-level vascular risk can produce negative cognitive effects in genetically susceptible individuals. Alleviation of treatable vascular risks in such persons may have a positive effect on age-related cognitive declines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus