Limits...
Interactions between posterior gamma and frontal alpha/beta oscillations during imagined actions.

de Lange FP, Jensen O, Bauer M, Toni I - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Bottom Line: Several studies have revealed that posterior parietal and frontal regions support planning of hand movements but far less is known about how these cortical regions interact during the mental simulation of a movement.Our results provide novel information about the oscillatory brain activity of posterior and frontal regions.The persistent functional coupling between these regions during task performance emphasizes the importance of sustained interactions between frontal and occipito-parietal areas during mental simulation of action.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: F.C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Radboud University Nijmegen The Netherlands. florisdelange@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Several studies have revealed that posterior parietal and frontal regions support planning of hand movements but far less is known about how these cortical regions interact during the mental simulation of a movement. Here, we have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate oscillatory interactions between posterior and frontal areas during the performance of a well-established motor imagery task that evokes motor simulation: mental rotation of hands. Motor imagery induced sustained power suppression in the alpha and beta band over the precentral gyrus and a power increase in the gamma band over bilateral occipito-parietal cortex. During motor imagery of left hand movements, there was stronger alpha and beta band suppression over the right precentral gyrus. The duration of these power changes increased, on a trial-by-trial basis, as a function of the motoric complexity of the imagined actions. Crucially, during a specific period of the movement simulation, the power fluctuations of the frontal beta-band oscillations became coupled with the occipito-parietal gamma-band oscillations. Our results provide novel information about the oscillatory brain activity of posterior and frontal regions. The persistent functional coupling between these regions during task performance emphasizes the importance of sustained interactions between frontal and occipito-parietal areas during mental simulation of action.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cross-frequency amplitude coupling. (A) Topographical distribution of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over left motor sensors (marked with ‘+’) and gamma power for each individual sensor, in the interval between −1.5 and −0.5 s preceding the subject's response. (B) Time course of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over left motor sensors (see Figure 2C-left panel for sensor selection) and gamma power over occipito-parietal sensors (see Figure 4C for sensor selection) is plotted in blue, and between beta power over left motor sensors and gamma power over left motor sensors is plotted in red. (C) Topographical distribution of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over right motor sensors (marked with ‘+’) and gamma power for each individual sensor, between −1.5 and −0.5 s preceding the subject's response. (D) Time course of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over right motor sensors (see Figure 2C-right panel for sensor selection) and gamma power over occipito-parietal sensors (see Figure 4C for sensor selection) is plotted in blue, and between beta power over right motor sensors and gamma power over right motor sensors is plotted in red.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572199&req=5

Figure 5: Cross-frequency amplitude coupling. (A) Topographical distribution of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over left motor sensors (marked with ‘+’) and gamma power for each individual sensor, in the interval between −1.5 and −0.5 s preceding the subject's response. (B) Time course of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over left motor sensors (see Figure 2C-left panel for sensor selection) and gamma power over occipito-parietal sensors (see Figure 4C for sensor selection) is plotted in blue, and between beta power over left motor sensors and gamma power over left motor sensors is plotted in red. (C) Topographical distribution of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over right motor sensors (marked with ‘+’) and gamma power for each individual sensor, between −1.5 and −0.5 s preceding the subject's response. (D) Time course of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over right motor sensors (see Figure 2C-right panel for sensor selection) and gamma power over occipito-parietal sensors (see Figure 4C for sensor selection) is plotted in blue, and between beta power over right motor sensors and gamma power over right motor sensors is plotted in red.

Mentions: In order to assess the interactions between occipito-parietal and precentral regions, we calculated the cross-frequency amplitude correlation between the oscillations of these regions over time. Specifically, we calculated the dependence between the amplitude envelope of the central alpha/beta rhythm and the posterior gamma rhythm during motor imagery. When we chose sensors over left and right motor cortex (see Figure 2C) as the reference regions, and calculated the correlation with gamma amplitude in all other sensors (see Figure 4A, C), this revealed an isolated region of negative correlations over occipito-parietal regions. The clear spatial segregation suggests that the anti-correlation is constituted by distinct regions. Beta-gamma coupling was significant between the left motor cortex and occipito-parietal cortex at [1 1.5] s post-stimulus, as well as [−1.5 −0.5] s pre-response (Figure 5B), and between the right motor cortex and occipito-parietal cortex at [1 1.5] s post-stimulus, as well as [−1.5 −1] s pre-response (Figure 5D). During baseline and the first second of the trial, as well as during the last 500 ms preceding response and after the response the cross-frequency coupling between posterior gamma and central beta was not significant (all p > 0.10). There was no significant coupling alpha-gamma coupling time-locked to the onset of the visual stimulus (all p > 0.10). When time-locking to the response, there was alpha-gamma coupling between right motor cortex and occipito-parietal cortex in the interval [−1.5 −1.0] s pre-response (p = 0.01), and a trend of alpha-gamma coupling between left motor cortex and occipito-parietal cortex (p = 0.08) in the same interval, while all the other intervals showed no significant alpha-gamma coupling (all p > 0.10). Surprisingly, there was no beta-gamma or alpha-gamma amplitude coupling within left or right motor cortex or between left and right motor cortex. Local alpha-gamma and beta-gamma coupling was observed within the occipito-parietal cortex. In summary, there was an amplitude coupling between motor beta and occipito-parietal gamma oscillations, which occurred at a specific time interval during motor imagery.


Interactions between posterior gamma and frontal alpha/beta oscillations during imagined actions.

de Lange FP, Jensen O, Bauer M, Toni I - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Cross-frequency amplitude coupling. (A) Topographical distribution of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over left motor sensors (marked with ‘+’) and gamma power for each individual sensor, in the interval between −1.5 and −0.5 s preceding the subject's response. (B) Time course of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over left motor sensors (see Figure 2C-left panel for sensor selection) and gamma power over occipito-parietal sensors (see Figure 4C for sensor selection) is plotted in blue, and between beta power over left motor sensors and gamma power over left motor sensors is plotted in red. (C) Topographical distribution of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over right motor sensors (marked with ‘+’) and gamma power for each individual sensor, between −1.5 and −0.5 s preceding the subject's response. (D) Time course of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over right motor sensors (see Figure 2C-right panel for sensor selection) and gamma power over occipito-parietal sensors (see Figure 4C for sensor selection) is plotted in blue, and between beta power over right motor sensors and gamma power over right motor sensors is plotted in red.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572199&req=5

Figure 5: Cross-frequency amplitude coupling. (A) Topographical distribution of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over left motor sensors (marked with ‘+’) and gamma power for each individual sensor, in the interval between −1.5 and −0.5 s preceding the subject's response. (B) Time course of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over left motor sensors (see Figure 2C-left panel for sensor selection) and gamma power over occipito-parietal sensors (see Figure 4C for sensor selection) is plotted in blue, and between beta power over left motor sensors and gamma power over left motor sensors is plotted in red. (C) Topographical distribution of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over right motor sensors (marked with ‘+’) and gamma power for each individual sensor, between −1.5 and −0.5 s preceding the subject's response. (D) Time course of Z-transformed correlation between beta power over right motor sensors (see Figure 2C-right panel for sensor selection) and gamma power over occipito-parietal sensors (see Figure 4C for sensor selection) is plotted in blue, and between beta power over right motor sensors and gamma power over right motor sensors is plotted in red.
Mentions: In order to assess the interactions between occipito-parietal and precentral regions, we calculated the cross-frequency amplitude correlation between the oscillations of these regions over time. Specifically, we calculated the dependence between the amplitude envelope of the central alpha/beta rhythm and the posterior gamma rhythm during motor imagery. When we chose sensors over left and right motor cortex (see Figure 2C) as the reference regions, and calculated the correlation with gamma amplitude in all other sensors (see Figure 4A, C), this revealed an isolated region of negative correlations over occipito-parietal regions. The clear spatial segregation suggests that the anti-correlation is constituted by distinct regions. Beta-gamma coupling was significant between the left motor cortex and occipito-parietal cortex at [1 1.5] s post-stimulus, as well as [−1.5 −0.5] s pre-response (Figure 5B), and between the right motor cortex and occipito-parietal cortex at [1 1.5] s post-stimulus, as well as [−1.5 −1] s pre-response (Figure 5D). During baseline and the first second of the trial, as well as during the last 500 ms preceding response and after the response the cross-frequency coupling between posterior gamma and central beta was not significant (all p > 0.10). There was no significant coupling alpha-gamma coupling time-locked to the onset of the visual stimulus (all p > 0.10). When time-locking to the response, there was alpha-gamma coupling between right motor cortex and occipito-parietal cortex in the interval [−1.5 −1.0] s pre-response (p = 0.01), and a trend of alpha-gamma coupling between left motor cortex and occipito-parietal cortex (p = 0.08) in the same interval, while all the other intervals showed no significant alpha-gamma coupling (all p > 0.10). Surprisingly, there was no beta-gamma or alpha-gamma amplitude coupling within left or right motor cortex or between left and right motor cortex. Local alpha-gamma and beta-gamma coupling was observed within the occipito-parietal cortex. In summary, there was an amplitude coupling between motor beta and occipito-parietal gamma oscillations, which occurred at a specific time interval during motor imagery.

Bottom Line: Several studies have revealed that posterior parietal and frontal regions support planning of hand movements but far less is known about how these cortical regions interact during the mental simulation of a movement.Our results provide novel information about the oscillatory brain activity of posterior and frontal regions.The persistent functional coupling between these regions during task performance emphasizes the importance of sustained interactions between frontal and occipito-parietal areas during mental simulation of action.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: F.C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Radboud University Nijmegen The Netherlands. florisdelange@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Several studies have revealed that posterior parietal and frontal regions support planning of hand movements but far less is known about how these cortical regions interact during the mental simulation of a movement. Here, we have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate oscillatory interactions between posterior and frontal areas during the performance of a well-established motor imagery task that evokes motor simulation: mental rotation of hands. Motor imagery induced sustained power suppression in the alpha and beta band over the precentral gyrus and a power increase in the gamma band over bilateral occipito-parietal cortex. During motor imagery of left hand movements, there was stronger alpha and beta band suppression over the right precentral gyrus. The duration of these power changes increased, on a trial-by-trial basis, as a function of the motoric complexity of the imagined actions. Crucially, during a specific period of the movement simulation, the power fluctuations of the frontal beta-band oscillations became coupled with the occipito-parietal gamma-band oscillations. Our results provide novel information about the oscillatory brain activity of posterior and frontal regions. The persistent functional coupling between these regions during task performance emphasizes the importance of sustained interactions between frontal and occipito-parietal areas during mental simulation of action.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus