Limits...
Interactions between posterior gamma and frontal alpha/beta oscillations during imagined actions.

de Lange FP, Jensen O, Bauer M, Toni I - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Bottom Line: Several studies have revealed that posterior parietal and frontal regions support planning of hand movements but far less is known about how these cortical regions interact during the mental simulation of a movement.Our results provide novel information about the oscillatory brain activity of posterior and frontal regions.The persistent functional coupling between these regions during task performance emphasizes the importance of sustained interactions between frontal and occipito-parietal areas during mental simulation of action.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: F.C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Radboud University Nijmegen The Netherlands. florisdelange@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Several studies have revealed that posterior parietal and frontal regions support planning of hand movements but far less is known about how these cortical regions interact during the mental simulation of a movement. Here, we have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate oscillatory interactions between posterior and frontal areas during the performance of a well-established motor imagery task that evokes motor simulation: mental rotation of hands. Motor imagery induced sustained power suppression in the alpha and beta band over the precentral gyrus and a power increase in the gamma band over bilateral occipito-parietal cortex. During motor imagery of left hand movements, there was stronger alpha and beta band suppression over the right precentral gyrus. The duration of these power changes increased, on a trial-by-trial basis, as a function of the motoric complexity of the imagined actions. Crucially, during a specific period of the movement simulation, the power fluctuations of the frontal beta-band oscillations became coupled with the occipito-parietal gamma-band oscillations. Our results provide novel information about the oscillatory brain activity of posterior and frontal regions. The persistent functional coupling between these regions during task performance emphasizes the importance of sustained interactions between frontal and occipito-parietal areas during mental simulation of action.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Task setup and behavioral performance. (A) Task setup. After a baseline period, subjects were presented with a hand image. Subjects had to judge whether the stimulus was a left or right hand. After the response, subjects received feedback about their performance by a color change of the fixation cross. (B) Behavioral performance. Reaction times increased with increasing rotation for both left hands (LH) and right hands (RH). There were no reaction time differences between left and right hands. (C) EMG of the left arm remained flat throughout the trial, whereas the EMG of the right arm deviated sharply ±0.1 s preceding the button press. There were no EMG differences between mental rotation of LH and RH in the left or right arm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572199&req=5

Figure 1: Task setup and behavioral performance. (A) Task setup. After a baseline period, subjects were presented with a hand image. Subjects had to judge whether the stimulus was a left or right hand. After the response, subjects received feedback about their performance by a color change of the fixation cross. (B) Behavioral performance. Reaction times increased with increasing rotation for both left hands (LH) and right hands (RH). There were no reaction time differences between left and right hands. (C) EMG of the left arm remained flat throughout the trial, whereas the EMG of the right arm deviated sharply ±0.1 s preceding the button press. There were no EMG differences between mental rotation of LH and RH in the left or right arm.

Mentions: The experimental stimuli were line drawings of left and right hands, viewed from the palm and from the back, varying in their rotation from 40° to 180° in 35° steps (see example in Figure 1A). These stimuli were presented using a PC running Presentation software (Neurobehavioral systems, Albany, USA). They were projected onto a screen that was positioned in front of the subject. The stimuli subtended a visual angle of ∼2°.


Interactions between posterior gamma and frontal alpha/beta oscillations during imagined actions.

de Lange FP, Jensen O, Bauer M, Toni I - Front Hum Neurosci (2008)

Task setup and behavioral performance. (A) Task setup. After a baseline period, subjects were presented with a hand image. Subjects had to judge whether the stimulus was a left or right hand. After the response, subjects received feedback about their performance by a color change of the fixation cross. (B) Behavioral performance. Reaction times increased with increasing rotation for both left hands (LH) and right hands (RH). There were no reaction time differences between left and right hands. (C) EMG of the left arm remained flat throughout the trial, whereas the EMG of the right arm deviated sharply ±0.1 s preceding the button press. There were no EMG differences between mental rotation of LH and RH in the left or right arm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572199&req=5

Figure 1: Task setup and behavioral performance. (A) Task setup. After a baseline period, subjects were presented with a hand image. Subjects had to judge whether the stimulus was a left or right hand. After the response, subjects received feedback about their performance by a color change of the fixation cross. (B) Behavioral performance. Reaction times increased with increasing rotation for both left hands (LH) and right hands (RH). There were no reaction time differences between left and right hands. (C) EMG of the left arm remained flat throughout the trial, whereas the EMG of the right arm deviated sharply ±0.1 s preceding the button press. There were no EMG differences between mental rotation of LH and RH in the left or right arm.
Mentions: The experimental stimuli were line drawings of left and right hands, viewed from the palm and from the back, varying in their rotation from 40° to 180° in 35° steps (see example in Figure 1A). These stimuli were presented using a PC running Presentation software (Neurobehavioral systems, Albany, USA). They were projected onto a screen that was positioned in front of the subject. The stimuli subtended a visual angle of ∼2°.

Bottom Line: Several studies have revealed that posterior parietal and frontal regions support planning of hand movements but far less is known about how these cortical regions interact during the mental simulation of a movement.Our results provide novel information about the oscillatory brain activity of posterior and frontal regions.The persistent functional coupling between these regions during task performance emphasizes the importance of sustained interactions between frontal and occipito-parietal areas during mental simulation of action.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: F.C. Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Radboud University Nijmegen The Netherlands. florisdelange@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Several studies have revealed that posterior parietal and frontal regions support planning of hand movements but far less is known about how these cortical regions interact during the mental simulation of a movement. Here, we have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate oscillatory interactions between posterior and frontal areas during the performance of a well-established motor imagery task that evokes motor simulation: mental rotation of hands. Motor imagery induced sustained power suppression in the alpha and beta band over the precentral gyrus and a power increase in the gamma band over bilateral occipito-parietal cortex. During motor imagery of left hand movements, there was stronger alpha and beta band suppression over the right precentral gyrus. The duration of these power changes increased, on a trial-by-trial basis, as a function of the motoric complexity of the imagined actions. Crucially, during a specific period of the movement simulation, the power fluctuations of the frontal beta-band oscillations became coupled with the occipito-parietal gamma-band oscillations. Our results provide novel information about the oscillatory brain activity of posterior and frontal regions. The persistent functional coupling between these regions during task performance emphasizes the importance of sustained interactions between frontal and occipito-parietal areas during mental simulation of action.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus