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Conduct disorder in girls: neighborhoods, family characteristics, and parenting behaviors.

Pajer K, Stein S, Tritt K, Chang CN, Wang W, Gardner W - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2008)

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between three social context domains (neighborhood, family characteristics, and parenting behaviors) and CD in adolescent girls, additionally testing for race moderation effects.Neighborhood quality was not associated with CD in girls.When these factors are thus controlled, CD in adolescent girls is not significantly associated with neighborhood, but is associated with some family characteristics and some types of parental behaviors.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Columbus, OH, USA. Kathleen.Pajer@Nationwidechildrens.org

ABSTRACT

Background: Little is known about the social context of girls with conduct disorder (CD), a question of increasing importance to clinicians and researchers. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between three social context domains (neighborhood, family characteristics, and parenting behaviors) and CD in adolescent girls, additionally testing for race moderation effects. We predicted that disadvantaged neighborhoods, family characteristics such as parental marital status, and parenting behaviors such as negative discipline would characterize girls with CD. We also hypothesized that parenting behaviors would mediate the associations between neighborhood and family characteristics and CD.

Methods: We recruited 93 15-17 year-old girls from the community and used a structured psychiatric interview to assign participants to a CD group (n = 52) or a demographically matched group with no psychiatric disorder (n = 41). Each girl and parent also filled out questionnaires about neighborhood, family characteristics, and parenting behaviors.

Results: Neighborhood quality was not associated with CD in girls. Some family characteristics (parental antisociality) and parenting behaviors (levels of family activities and negative discipline) were characteristic of girls with CD, but notll. There was no moderation by race. Our hypothesis that the association between family characteristics and CD would be mediated by parenting behaviors was not supported.

Conclusion: This study expanded upon previous research by investigating multiple social context domains in girls with CD and by selecting a comparison group who were not different in age, social class, or race. When these factors are thus controlled, CD in adolescent girls is not significantly associated with neighborhood, but is associated with some family characteristics and some types of parental behaviors. However, the mechanisms underlying these relationships need to be further investigated. We discuss possible explanations for our findings and suggest directions for future research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mediation analysis model.
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Figure 1: Mediation analysis model.

Mentions: As presented above, the overall social context level of neighbourhood was not significantly associated with CD. Therefore, we only tested a meditational analysis with the family characteristics domain, using parental antisocial behavior, the only variable that remained significantly associated with CD in the logistic regression analysis. Figure 1 presents the mediation analysis model. All components of the model met Baron and Kenny criteria for a meditational relationship: a) parental antisocial behavior is associated with CD, b) parental antisocial behavior is associated with parenting behaviors and c) parenting behaviors are significantly associated with CD. However, the z statistics for the indirect effects of parental antisocial behavior on CD through mediation by parenting behaviors fell short of statistical significance (for the mediating path through family activity, z = 1.488, p = .137; and for the path through negative discipline, z = 1.88, p = .060). Thus, our data did not support the hypothesis that the association between parental antisocial behavior and CD in girls could be explained by parenting behaviors.


Conduct disorder in girls: neighborhoods, family characteristics, and parenting behaviors.

Pajer K, Stein S, Tritt K, Chang CN, Wang W, Gardner W - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2008)

Mediation analysis model.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2572160&req=5

Figure 1: Mediation analysis model.
Mentions: As presented above, the overall social context level of neighbourhood was not significantly associated with CD. Therefore, we only tested a meditational analysis with the family characteristics domain, using parental antisocial behavior, the only variable that remained significantly associated with CD in the logistic regression analysis. Figure 1 presents the mediation analysis model. All components of the model met Baron and Kenny criteria for a meditational relationship: a) parental antisocial behavior is associated with CD, b) parental antisocial behavior is associated with parenting behaviors and c) parenting behaviors are significantly associated with CD. However, the z statistics for the indirect effects of parental antisocial behavior on CD through mediation by parenting behaviors fell short of statistical significance (for the mediating path through family activity, z = 1.488, p = .137; and for the path through negative discipline, z = 1.88, p = .060). Thus, our data did not support the hypothesis that the association between parental antisocial behavior and CD in girls could be explained by parenting behaviors.

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between three social context domains (neighborhood, family characteristics, and parenting behaviors) and CD in adolescent girls, additionally testing for race moderation effects.Neighborhood quality was not associated with CD in girls.When these factors are thus controlled, CD in adolescent girls is not significantly associated with neighborhood, but is associated with some family characteristics and some types of parental behaviors.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Columbus, OH, USA. Kathleen.Pajer@Nationwidechildrens.org

ABSTRACT

Background: Little is known about the social context of girls with conduct disorder (CD), a question of increasing importance to clinicians and researchers. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between three social context domains (neighborhood, family characteristics, and parenting behaviors) and CD in adolescent girls, additionally testing for race moderation effects. We predicted that disadvantaged neighborhoods, family characteristics such as parental marital status, and parenting behaviors such as negative discipline would characterize girls with CD. We also hypothesized that parenting behaviors would mediate the associations between neighborhood and family characteristics and CD.

Methods: We recruited 93 15-17 year-old girls from the community and used a structured psychiatric interview to assign participants to a CD group (n = 52) or a demographically matched group with no psychiatric disorder (n = 41). Each girl and parent also filled out questionnaires about neighborhood, family characteristics, and parenting behaviors.

Results: Neighborhood quality was not associated with CD in girls. Some family characteristics (parental antisociality) and parenting behaviors (levels of family activities and negative discipline) were characteristic of girls with CD, but notll. There was no moderation by race. Our hypothesis that the association between family characteristics and CD would be mediated by parenting behaviors was not supported.

Conclusion: This study expanded upon previous research by investigating multiple social context domains in girls with CD and by selecting a comparison group who were not different in age, social class, or race. When these factors are thus controlled, CD in adolescent girls is not significantly associated with neighborhood, but is associated with some family characteristics and some types of parental behaviors. However, the mechanisms underlying these relationships need to be further investigated. We discuss possible explanations for our findings and suggest directions for future research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus