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Reproducibility of dynamically represented acoustic lung images from healthy individuals.

Maher TM, Gat M, Allen D, Devaraj A, Wells AU, Geddes DM - Thorax (2007)

Bottom Line: There was no significant difference found between the six raters at any time point.Acoustic lung imaging is reproducible in healthy individuals.Graphic representation of lung images can be interpreted with a high degree of accuracy by the same and by different reviewers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, Interstitial Lung Disease Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney St, London SW3 6NP, UK. t.maher@ucl.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background and aim: Acoustic lung imaging offers a unique method for visualising the lung. This study was designed to demonstrate reproducibility of acoustic lung images recorded from healthy individuals at different time points and to assess intra- and inter-rater agreement in the assessment of dynamically represented acoustic lung images.

Methods: Recordings from 29 healthy volunteers were made on three separate occasions using vibration response imaging. Reproducibility was measured using quantitative, computerised assessment of vibration energy. Dynamically represented acoustic lung images were scored by six blinded raters.

Results: Quantitative measurement of acoustic recordings was highly reproducible with an intraclass correlation score of 0.86 (very good agreement). Intraclass correlations for inter-rater agreement and reproducibility were 0.61 (good agreement) and 0.86 (very good agreement), respectively. There was no significant difference found between the six raters at any time point. Raters ranged from 88% to 95% in their ability to identically evaluate the different features of the same image presented to them blinded on two separate occasions.

Conclusion: Acoustic lung imaging is reproducible in healthy individuals. Graphic representation of lung images can be interpreted with a high degree of accuracy by the same and by different reviewers.

Show MeSH
Frame by frame representation of a dynamic acoustic lung image. Each frame represents cumulative information of 0.17 s of recording time. The image demonstrates a typical crescendo–decrescendo appearance of vibration energy first in inspiration then in expiration. L, left; R, right.
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THX-63-06-0542-f02: Frame by frame representation of a dynamic acoustic lung image. Each frame represents cumulative information of 0.17 s of recording time. The image demonstrates a typical crescendo–decrescendo appearance of vibration energy first in inspiration then in expiration. L, left; R, right.

Mentions: Graphical representation of the filtered frequencies is by grey scale coded dynamic image, based on a two-dimensional coordinate system that corresponds with the regional position of the sensor vectors. Vibration energy is normalised across the whole recording and the output expressed on a 0–4 scale of relative intensity. High intensity vibration energy is depicted in dark grey through to black. Low intensity vibration energy shows as grey and absence of vibrations as white. In the dynamic image, the distribution of vibration energy is displayed along time. Additionally, the display shows a graph plotting average vibration energy (blue inspiration, red expiration) as a function of time. A simple user interface enables the selection and assessment of static images of vibration energy at any given point of inspiration or expiration (figs 1, 2). The image obtained at peak inspiration displays the distribution of the maximal vibration energy occurring during the respiratory cycle and has been termed the maximum energy frame (MEF) (fig 1).


Reproducibility of dynamically represented acoustic lung images from healthy individuals.

Maher TM, Gat M, Allen D, Devaraj A, Wells AU, Geddes DM - Thorax (2007)

Frame by frame representation of a dynamic acoustic lung image. Each frame represents cumulative information of 0.17 s of recording time. The image demonstrates a typical crescendo–decrescendo appearance of vibration energy first in inspiration then in expiration. L, left; R, right.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2571960&req=5

THX-63-06-0542-f02: Frame by frame representation of a dynamic acoustic lung image. Each frame represents cumulative information of 0.17 s of recording time. The image demonstrates a typical crescendo–decrescendo appearance of vibration energy first in inspiration then in expiration. L, left; R, right.
Mentions: Graphical representation of the filtered frequencies is by grey scale coded dynamic image, based on a two-dimensional coordinate system that corresponds with the regional position of the sensor vectors. Vibration energy is normalised across the whole recording and the output expressed on a 0–4 scale of relative intensity. High intensity vibration energy is depicted in dark grey through to black. Low intensity vibration energy shows as grey and absence of vibrations as white. In the dynamic image, the distribution of vibration energy is displayed along time. Additionally, the display shows a graph plotting average vibration energy (blue inspiration, red expiration) as a function of time. A simple user interface enables the selection and assessment of static images of vibration energy at any given point of inspiration or expiration (figs 1, 2). The image obtained at peak inspiration displays the distribution of the maximal vibration energy occurring during the respiratory cycle and has been termed the maximum energy frame (MEF) (fig 1).

Bottom Line: There was no significant difference found between the six raters at any time point.Acoustic lung imaging is reproducible in healthy individuals.Graphic representation of lung images can be interpreted with a high degree of accuracy by the same and by different reviewers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, Interstitial Lung Disease Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney St, London SW3 6NP, UK. t.maher@ucl.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background and aim: Acoustic lung imaging offers a unique method for visualising the lung. This study was designed to demonstrate reproducibility of acoustic lung images recorded from healthy individuals at different time points and to assess intra- and inter-rater agreement in the assessment of dynamically represented acoustic lung images.

Methods: Recordings from 29 healthy volunteers were made on three separate occasions using vibration response imaging. Reproducibility was measured using quantitative, computerised assessment of vibration energy. Dynamically represented acoustic lung images were scored by six blinded raters.

Results: Quantitative measurement of acoustic recordings was highly reproducible with an intraclass correlation score of 0.86 (very good agreement). Intraclass correlations for inter-rater agreement and reproducibility were 0.61 (good agreement) and 0.86 (very good agreement), respectively. There was no significant difference found between the six raters at any time point. Raters ranged from 88% to 95% in their ability to identically evaluate the different features of the same image presented to them blinded on two separate occasions.

Conclusion: Acoustic lung imaging is reproducible in healthy individuals. Graphic representation of lung images can be interpreted with a high degree of accuracy by the same and by different reviewers.

Show MeSH