Limits...
Nicole Baumgarth: tackling flu from a B cell angle. Interviewed by Amy Maxmem.

Baumgarth N - J. Exp. Med. (2008)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Last year, though, it didn't work because it wasn't perfectly matched [to the prevalent virus strain]. …One focus of my lab is to look at the cells that make broadly reactive antibodies to all sorts of different pathogens in a nonspecific way... We want to see if we can use the properties of these antibodies in a vaccine approach to either increase their numbers or to make them go to the site where they're needed for protection. …At Stanford we found that you need the natural antibodies to be protected from flu... The [influenza] infection actually occurs in the respiratory tract, not in the blood... So we looked in the respiratory tract, and we saw that the B1 cells accumulate there after infection... Or stimulate B1 cells to migrate to the respiratory tract if you knew there was a respiratory infection? The fact that there is a B1 cell response to flu infection means we might be able to mimic that response with a vaccine or therapeutic... Nobody may agree with me... I've loved B cells for as long as I can remember... I didn't know what immunology was but I chose it anyway... When I learned about antibody production…there was just something about it, I just loved it... I had to work on T cells for four years, but the moment I could, I switched back to B cells... I don't know why... Bizarre.

Show MeSH
Nicole Baumgarth
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2571919&req=5

fig1: Nicole Baumgarth


Nicole Baumgarth: tackling flu from a B cell angle. Interviewed by Amy Maxmem.

Baumgarth N - J. Exp. Med. (2008)

Nicole Baumgarth
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2571919&req=5

fig1: Nicole Baumgarth

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Last year, though, it didn't work because it wasn't perfectly matched [to the prevalent virus strain]. …One focus of my lab is to look at the cells that make broadly reactive antibodies to all sorts of different pathogens in a nonspecific way... We want to see if we can use the properties of these antibodies in a vaccine approach to either increase their numbers or to make them go to the site where they're needed for protection. …At Stanford we found that you need the natural antibodies to be protected from flu... The [influenza] infection actually occurs in the respiratory tract, not in the blood... So we looked in the respiratory tract, and we saw that the B1 cells accumulate there after infection... Or stimulate B1 cells to migrate to the respiratory tract if you knew there was a respiratory infection? The fact that there is a B1 cell response to flu infection means we might be able to mimic that response with a vaccine or therapeutic... Nobody may agree with me... I've loved B cells for as long as I can remember... I didn't know what immunology was but I chose it anyway... When I learned about antibody production…there was just something about it, I just loved it... I had to work on T cells for four years, but the moment I could, I switched back to B cells... I don't know why... Bizarre.

Show MeSH