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Syzygium jambolanum treatment improves survival in lethal sepsis induced in mice.

Maciel MC, Farias JC, Maluf MJ, Gomes EA, Pereira PV, Aragão-Filho WC, Frazão JB, Costa GC, Sousa SM, Silva LA, Amaral FM, Russo M, Guerra RN, Nascimento FR - BMC Complement Altern Med (2008)

Bottom Line: Despite the increased migration and activation of peritoneal cells the HCE treatment did not decrease the number of CFU.The HCE treatment induced a significant decrease on the bone marrow cells number but did not alter the cell number of the spleen and lymph node.We conclude that the treatment with S. jambolanum has a potent prophylactic anti-septic effect that is not associated to a direct microbicidal effect but it is associated to a recruitment of activated neutrophils to the infectious site and to a diminished systemic inflammatory response.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Immunophysiology, Federal University of Maranhão, São Luís, MA, Brazil. macielmcg@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The leaves and the fruits from Syzygium jambolanum DC.(Myrtaceae), a plant known in Brazil as sweet olive or 'jambolão', have been used by native people to treat infectious diseases, diabetes, and stomachache. Since the bactericidal activity of S. jambolanum has been confirmed in vitro, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the prophylactic treatment with S. jambolanum on the in vivo polymicrobial infection induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice.

Methods: C57Bl/6 mice were treated by the subcutaneous route with a hydroalcoholic extract from fresh leaves of S. jambolanum (HCE). After 6 h, a bacterial infection was induced in the peritoneum using the lethal CLP model. The mice were killed 12 h after the CLP induction to evaluate the cellular influx and local and systemic inflammatory mediators' production. Some animals were maintained alive to evaluate the survival rate.

Results: The prophylactic HCE treatment increased the mice survival, the neutrophil migration to infectious site, the spreading ability and the hydrogen peroxide release, but decreased the serum TNF and nitrite. Despite the increased migration and activation of peritoneal cells the HCE treatment did not decrease the number of CFU. The HCE treatment induced a significant decrease on the bone marrow cells number but did not alter the cell number of the spleen and lymph node.

Conclusion: We conclude that the treatment with S. jambolanum has a potent prophylactic anti-septic effect that is not associated to a direct microbicidal effect but it is associated to a recruitment of activated neutrophils to the infectious site and to a diminished systemic inflammatory response.

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Effect of Syzygium jambolanum HCE treatment on lethal sepsis induced by CLP. The cecum was perforated 8× with an 18 G needle. The treatment with HCE at the doses of 5 (HCE 5) or 50 mg/Kg (HCE 50) was done 6 hours before the CLP. The mice survival was observed until the 5th day. The results were expressed as mean ± S.E.M of 10 animal/group.
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Figure 1: Effect of Syzygium jambolanum HCE treatment on lethal sepsis induced by CLP. The cecum was perforated 8× with an 18 G needle. The treatment with HCE at the doses of 5 (HCE 5) or 50 mg/Kg (HCE 50) was done 6 hours before the CLP. The mice survival was observed until the 5th day. The results were expressed as mean ± S.E.M of 10 animal/group.

Mentions: The CLP induced the death of 80% of the mice until the 24th hour in the control group. However, the prophylactic HCE treatment improved the mice survival when compared to the control group (Figure 1). The survival was followed by one month and that mice which had survive until the 5th day remains alive by all the period. Based on this result, in the rest of experiments, the mice were treated with HCE and killed 12 h after the CLP induction to investigate the mechanisms of protection.


Syzygium jambolanum treatment improves survival in lethal sepsis induced in mice.

Maciel MC, Farias JC, Maluf MJ, Gomes EA, Pereira PV, Aragão-Filho WC, Frazão JB, Costa GC, Sousa SM, Silva LA, Amaral FM, Russo M, Guerra RN, Nascimento FR - BMC Complement Altern Med (2008)

Effect of Syzygium jambolanum HCE treatment on lethal sepsis induced by CLP. The cecum was perforated 8× with an 18 G needle. The treatment with HCE at the doses of 5 (HCE 5) or 50 mg/Kg (HCE 50) was done 6 hours before the CLP. The mice survival was observed until the 5th day. The results were expressed as mean ± S.E.M of 10 animal/group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2571085&req=5

Figure 1: Effect of Syzygium jambolanum HCE treatment on lethal sepsis induced by CLP. The cecum was perforated 8× with an 18 G needle. The treatment with HCE at the doses of 5 (HCE 5) or 50 mg/Kg (HCE 50) was done 6 hours before the CLP. The mice survival was observed until the 5th day. The results were expressed as mean ± S.E.M of 10 animal/group.
Mentions: The CLP induced the death of 80% of the mice until the 24th hour in the control group. However, the prophylactic HCE treatment improved the mice survival when compared to the control group (Figure 1). The survival was followed by one month and that mice which had survive until the 5th day remains alive by all the period. Based on this result, in the rest of experiments, the mice were treated with HCE and killed 12 h after the CLP induction to investigate the mechanisms of protection.

Bottom Line: Despite the increased migration and activation of peritoneal cells the HCE treatment did not decrease the number of CFU.The HCE treatment induced a significant decrease on the bone marrow cells number but did not alter the cell number of the spleen and lymph node.We conclude that the treatment with S. jambolanum has a potent prophylactic anti-septic effect that is not associated to a direct microbicidal effect but it is associated to a recruitment of activated neutrophils to the infectious site and to a diminished systemic inflammatory response.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Immunophysiology, Federal University of Maranhão, São Luís, MA, Brazil. macielmcg@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The leaves and the fruits from Syzygium jambolanum DC.(Myrtaceae), a plant known in Brazil as sweet olive or 'jambolão', have been used by native people to treat infectious diseases, diabetes, and stomachache. Since the bactericidal activity of S. jambolanum has been confirmed in vitro, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the prophylactic treatment with S. jambolanum on the in vivo polymicrobial infection induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice.

Methods: C57Bl/6 mice were treated by the subcutaneous route with a hydroalcoholic extract from fresh leaves of S. jambolanum (HCE). After 6 h, a bacterial infection was induced in the peritoneum using the lethal CLP model. The mice were killed 12 h after the CLP induction to evaluate the cellular influx and local and systemic inflammatory mediators' production. Some animals were maintained alive to evaluate the survival rate.

Results: The prophylactic HCE treatment increased the mice survival, the neutrophil migration to infectious site, the spreading ability and the hydrogen peroxide release, but decreased the serum TNF and nitrite. Despite the increased migration and activation of peritoneal cells the HCE treatment did not decrease the number of CFU. The HCE treatment induced a significant decrease on the bone marrow cells number but did not alter the cell number of the spleen and lymph node.

Conclusion: We conclude that the treatment with S. jambolanum has a potent prophylactic anti-septic effect that is not associated to a direct microbicidal effect but it is associated to a recruitment of activated neutrophils to the infectious site and to a diminished systemic inflammatory response.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus