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Duration of nocturnal hypoglycemia before seizures.

Buckingham B, Wilson DM, Lecher T, Hanas R, Kaiserman K, Cameron F - Diabetes Care (2008)

Bottom Line: In this article, we describe four such cases and assess the duration of nocturnal hypoglycemia before the seizure.In the cases where patients had a nocturnal hypoglycemic seizure while wearing a CGM device, sensor hypoglycemia (<60 mg/dl) was documented on the CGM record for 2.25-4 h before seizure activity.Current nocturnal hypoglycemic alarms need to be improved, however, since patients can sleep through the current alarm systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, Pediatric Endocrinology, Stanford, California, USA. buckingham@stanford.edu.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Despite a high incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia documented by the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), there are no reports in the literature of nocturnal hypoglycemic seizures while a patient is wearing a CGM device.

Research design and methods: In this article, we describe four such cases and assess the duration of nocturnal hypoglycemia before the seizure.

Results: In the cases where patients had a nocturnal hypoglycemic seizure while wearing a CGM device, sensor hypoglycemia (<60 mg/dl) was documented on the CGM record for 2.25-4 h before seizure activity.

Conclusions: Even with a subcutaneous glucose lag of 18 min when compared with blood glucose measurements, glucose sensors have time to provide clinically meaningful alarms. Current nocturnal hypoglycemic alarms need to be improved, however, since patients can sleep through the current alarm systems.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Case 1: 15-year-old male wearing an original Minimed CGMS. Case 2: 12-year-old female wearing a Minimed CGMS-Gold monitor. Case 3: 16-year-old female wearing the original Minimed CGMS. Case 4: 17-year-old female wearing a MiniMed 722 Paradigm real-time continuous glucose monitor. Alarm “bell” along time axis at bottom of graph indicates alarming (vibratory and then audio). BG, blood glucose.
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f1: Case 1: 15-year-old male wearing an original Minimed CGMS. Case 2: 12-year-old female wearing a Minimed CGMS-Gold monitor. Case 3: 16-year-old female wearing the original Minimed CGMS. Case 4: 17-year-old female wearing a MiniMed 722 Paradigm real-time continuous glucose monitor. Alarm “bell” along time axis at bottom of graph indicates alarming (vibratory and then audio). BG, blood glucose.


Duration of nocturnal hypoglycemia before seizures.

Buckingham B, Wilson DM, Lecher T, Hanas R, Kaiserman K, Cameron F - Diabetes Care (2008)

Case 1: 15-year-old male wearing an original Minimed CGMS. Case 2: 12-year-old female wearing a Minimed CGMS-Gold monitor. Case 3: 16-year-old female wearing the original Minimed CGMS. Case 4: 17-year-old female wearing a MiniMed 722 Paradigm real-time continuous glucose monitor. Alarm “bell” along time axis at bottom of graph indicates alarming (vibratory and then audio). BG, blood glucose.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2571056&req=5

f1: Case 1: 15-year-old male wearing an original Minimed CGMS. Case 2: 12-year-old female wearing a Minimed CGMS-Gold monitor. Case 3: 16-year-old female wearing the original Minimed CGMS. Case 4: 17-year-old female wearing a MiniMed 722 Paradigm real-time continuous glucose monitor. Alarm “bell” along time axis at bottom of graph indicates alarming (vibratory and then audio). BG, blood glucose.
Bottom Line: In this article, we describe four such cases and assess the duration of nocturnal hypoglycemia before the seizure.In the cases where patients had a nocturnal hypoglycemic seizure while wearing a CGM device, sensor hypoglycemia (<60 mg/dl) was documented on the CGM record for 2.25-4 h before seizure activity.Current nocturnal hypoglycemic alarms need to be improved, however, since patients can sleep through the current alarm systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, Pediatric Endocrinology, Stanford, California, USA. buckingham@stanford.edu.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Despite a high incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia documented by the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), there are no reports in the literature of nocturnal hypoglycemic seizures while a patient is wearing a CGM device.

Research design and methods: In this article, we describe four such cases and assess the duration of nocturnal hypoglycemia before the seizure.

Results: In the cases where patients had a nocturnal hypoglycemic seizure while wearing a CGM device, sensor hypoglycemia (<60 mg/dl) was documented on the CGM record for 2.25-4 h before seizure activity.

Conclusions: Even with a subcutaneous glucose lag of 18 min when compared with blood glucose measurements, glucose sensors have time to provide clinically meaningful alarms. Current nocturnal hypoglycemic alarms need to be improved, however, since patients can sleep through the current alarm systems.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus