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Normal glucose values are associated with a lower risk of mortality in hospitalized patients.

Bruno A, Gregori D, Caropreso A, Lazzarato F, Petrinco M, Pagano E - Diabetes Care (2008)

Bottom Line: All-patient refined diagnosis-related groups and the relative risk of death were the matching criteria.A multivariate conditional logistic regression model was used to evaluate the associations between death and glycemia.Higher in-hospital mortality was associated with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, whereas lower risk was observed for values between 78 and 101 mg/dl.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diabetologia ASO San Giovanni Battista of Turin, Turin, Italy. abruno@molinette.piemonte.it

ABSTRACT

Objective: Hyperglycemia is a common condition in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between glycemia upon admission and mortality in a heterogeneous group of adult patients.

Research design and methods: The 3-year records released from a general hospital were associated with a plasma glucose dataset of its general laboratory. A matched case-control study was implemented (3,338 case-control subject pairs). All-patient refined diagnosis-related groups and the relative risk of death were the matching criteria. A multivariate conditional logistic regression model was used to evaluate the associations between death and glycemia.

Results: Higher in-hospital mortality was associated with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, whereas lower risk was observed for values between 78 and 101 mg/dl.

Conclusions: Our data confirm the relation between glycemia upon admission and mortality and suggest that slightly increased or decreased plasma glucose can be linked with increased mortality risk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of plasma glucose values at admission in hospital (black line) on risk of in-hospital death (log odds) and 95% CIs (dotted lines) adjusted by sex, civil status, age, educational levels, type of admission, and type of treatment.
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f1: Effect of plasma glucose values at admission in hospital (black line) on risk of in-hospital death (log odds) and 95% CIs (dotted lines) adjusted by sex, civil status, age, educational levels, type of admission, and type of treatment.

Mentions: The whole population with plasma glucose available at admission presents 69,996 cases (mean 65 years of age [range 51–75]; 42% female; 5% dead). Within this group, we analyzed a cohort of 3,338 cases (dead) versus 3,338 control subjects (alive) (mean 70 years of age [59–78] vs. 73 years of age [63–80]; 40 vs. 42% female; and mean 99 mg/dl [82–128] vs. 107 mg/dl [85–144] plasma glucose on admission). The effect of plasma glucose adjusted by administration data was nonlinear, as described in Fig. 1. Accordingly, the minimal risk of in-hospital mortality was found at plasma glucose levels of mean 89 mg/dl (range 78–101). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of deaths for plasma glucose on admission from 100 to 200 mg/dl is 1.32 (95% CI 1.22–1.43), whereas the OR for plasma glucose from 60 to 80 mg/dl is 1.06 (1.04–1.07).


Normal glucose values are associated with a lower risk of mortality in hospitalized patients.

Bruno A, Gregori D, Caropreso A, Lazzarato F, Petrinco M, Pagano E - Diabetes Care (2008)

Effect of plasma glucose values at admission in hospital (black line) on risk of in-hospital death (log odds) and 95% CIs (dotted lines) adjusted by sex, civil status, age, educational levels, type of admission, and type of treatment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2571047&req=5

f1: Effect of plasma glucose values at admission in hospital (black line) on risk of in-hospital death (log odds) and 95% CIs (dotted lines) adjusted by sex, civil status, age, educational levels, type of admission, and type of treatment.
Mentions: The whole population with plasma glucose available at admission presents 69,996 cases (mean 65 years of age [range 51–75]; 42% female; 5% dead). Within this group, we analyzed a cohort of 3,338 cases (dead) versus 3,338 control subjects (alive) (mean 70 years of age [59–78] vs. 73 years of age [63–80]; 40 vs. 42% female; and mean 99 mg/dl [82–128] vs. 107 mg/dl [85–144] plasma glucose on admission). The effect of plasma glucose adjusted by administration data was nonlinear, as described in Fig. 1. Accordingly, the minimal risk of in-hospital mortality was found at plasma glucose levels of mean 89 mg/dl (range 78–101). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of deaths for plasma glucose on admission from 100 to 200 mg/dl is 1.32 (95% CI 1.22–1.43), whereas the OR for plasma glucose from 60 to 80 mg/dl is 1.06 (1.04–1.07).

Bottom Line: All-patient refined diagnosis-related groups and the relative risk of death were the matching criteria.A multivariate conditional logistic regression model was used to evaluate the associations between death and glycemia.Higher in-hospital mortality was associated with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, whereas lower risk was observed for values between 78 and 101 mg/dl.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diabetologia ASO San Giovanni Battista of Turin, Turin, Italy. abruno@molinette.piemonte.it

ABSTRACT

Objective: Hyperglycemia is a common condition in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between glycemia upon admission and mortality in a heterogeneous group of adult patients.

Research design and methods: The 3-year records released from a general hospital were associated with a plasma glucose dataset of its general laboratory. A matched case-control study was implemented (3,338 case-control subject pairs). All-patient refined diagnosis-related groups and the relative risk of death were the matching criteria. A multivariate conditional logistic regression model was used to evaluate the associations between death and glycemia.

Results: Higher in-hospital mortality was associated with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, whereas lower risk was observed for values between 78 and 101 mg/dl.

Conclusions: Our data confirm the relation between glycemia upon admission and mortality and suggest that slightly increased or decreased plasma glucose can be linked with increased mortality risk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus