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Lorraine strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, France.

Ginevra C, Forey F, Campèse C, Reyrolle M, Che D, Etienne J, Jarraud S - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

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Epidemiologic analyses based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequence-based typing of clinical isolates of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 have detected sporadic, epidemic, and endemic strains... Most cases are sporadic and are associated with strains that have not been identified... All L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates are typed by PFGE methods as described... When necessary, sequence-based typing and monoclonal antibody–based (MAb) subgrouping are also used... Another 145 (8.2%) patterns were identical and corresponded to the endemic Paris strain... An identical PGFE pattern was also found for 80 (4.5%) isolates from epidemiologically unrelated patients; these isolates were further characterized by sequence-based typing and MAb subgrouping... Sequence type was deduced for the following genes: flaA, pilE, asd, mip, mompS, proA, and neuA... The Lorraine strain is thus rarely found in water samples, which hinders environmental investigations of its sources in outbreaks of legionellosis... A similar disparity between the clinical and environmental distribution of Legionella strains has been reported... In a collection of 284 unrelated clinical isolates and 117 unrelated environmental isolates, Harrison et al. found that 3 types, identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism, accounted for 40% of clinical isolates but only 18% of environmental isolates... The high prevalence of the Lorraine strain in clinical samples and its extremely rare detection in water samples have several possible explanations: 1) this strain could be related to specific host factors; 2) it could be highly virulent even in low amounts, below the culture detection limit; and 3) it could be more susceptible than other strains to different stressors (e.g., biocide treatment, selective preplating techniques, environmental medium specific components).

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Prevalence of the Legionella pneumophila Paris (black bars) and Lorraine (grey bars) endemic strains, France, 1995–2006. White bar sections represent the proportion of strains isolated during outbreaks. For example, in 2000 the Paris strain accounted for 16.9% of clinical isolates: 12.5% unrelated and 4.4% related to the same outbreak. Numbers above each bar indicate the number of isolates.
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Figure 1: Prevalence of the Legionella pneumophila Paris (black bars) and Lorraine (grey bars) endemic strains, France, 1995–2006. White bar sections represent the proportion of strains isolated during outbreaks. For example, in 2000 the Paris strain accounted for 16.9% of clinical isolates: 12.5% unrelated and 4.4% related to the same outbreak. Numbers above each bar indicate the number of isolates.

Mentions: Isolation of the Lorraine strain was reported anecdotally before 2002. Since 2002, the prevalence of this strain in France has increased considerably, accounting for 10.5% clinical isolates in 2005 and 9.0% in 2006 (Figure). In contrast, prevalence of the Paris strain was ≈10% from 1998 through 2002 and peaked in 2000 (16.9%) in association with a hospital outbreak in Paris. From 2003 through 2006, prevalence of the Paris strain fell to ≈6.5%.


Lorraine strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, France.

Ginevra C, Forey F, Campèse C, Reyrolle M, Che D, Etienne J, Jarraud S - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Prevalence of the Legionella pneumophila Paris (black bars) and Lorraine (grey bars) endemic strains, France, 1995–2006. White bar sections represent the proportion of strains isolated during outbreaks. For example, in 2000 the Paris strain accounted for 16.9% of clinical isolates: 12.5% unrelated and 4.4% related to the same outbreak. Numbers above each bar indicate the number of isolates.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570941&req=5

Figure 1: Prevalence of the Legionella pneumophila Paris (black bars) and Lorraine (grey bars) endemic strains, France, 1995–2006. White bar sections represent the proportion of strains isolated during outbreaks. For example, in 2000 the Paris strain accounted for 16.9% of clinical isolates: 12.5% unrelated and 4.4% related to the same outbreak. Numbers above each bar indicate the number of isolates.
Mentions: Isolation of the Lorraine strain was reported anecdotally before 2002. Since 2002, the prevalence of this strain in France has increased considerably, accounting for 10.5% clinical isolates in 2005 and 9.0% in 2006 (Figure). In contrast, prevalence of the Paris strain was ≈10% from 1998 through 2002 and peaked in 2000 (16.9%) in association with a hospital outbreak in Paris. From 2003 through 2006, prevalence of the Paris strain fell to ≈6.5%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Epidemiologic analyses based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequence-based typing of clinical isolates of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 have detected sporadic, epidemic, and endemic strains... Most cases are sporadic and are associated with strains that have not been identified... All L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates are typed by PFGE methods as described... When necessary, sequence-based typing and monoclonal antibody–based (MAb) subgrouping are also used... Another 145 (8.2%) patterns were identical and corresponded to the endemic Paris strain... An identical PGFE pattern was also found for 80 (4.5%) isolates from epidemiologically unrelated patients; these isolates were further characterized by sequence-based typing and MAb subgrouping... Sequence type was deduced for the following genes: flaA, pilE, asd, mip, mompS, proA, and neuA... The Lorraine strain is thus rarely found in water samples, which hinders environmental investigations of its sources in outbreaks of legionellosis... A similar disparity between the clinical and environmental distribution of Legionella strains has been reported... In a collection of 284 unrelated clinical isolates and 117 unrelated environmental isolates, Harrison et al. found that 3 types, identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism, accounted for 40% of clinical isolates but only 18% of environmental isolates... The high prevalence of the Lorraine strain in clinical samples and its extremely rare detection in water samples have several possible explanations: 1) this strain could be related to specific host factors; 2) it could be highly virulent even in low amounts, below the culture detection limit; and 3) it could be more susceptible than other strains to different stressors (e.g., biocide treatment, selective preplating techniques, environmental medium specific components).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus