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Emericella quadrilineata as cause of invasive aspergillosis.

Verweij PE, Varga J, Houbraken J, Rijs AJ, Verduynlunel FM, Blijlevens NM, Shea YR, Holland SM, Warris A, Melchers WJ, Samson RA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: We noted a cluster of 4 cases of infection or colonization by Emericella spp., identified by sequence-based analysis as E. quadrilineata.For 12 isolates classified as E. quadrilineata, only 6 had been previously identified accordingly.These data indicate that sequence-based identification is more accurate than morphologic examination for identifying Emericella spp. and that correct species demarcation and in vitro susceptibility testing may affect patient management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. p.verweij@mmb.umcn.nl

ABSTRACT
We noted a cluster of 4 cases of infection or colonization by Emericella spp., identified by sequence-based analysis as E. quadrilineata. Sequence-based analysis of an international collection of 33 Emericella isolates identified 12 as E. nidulans, all 12 of which had previously been identified by morphologic methods as E. nidulans. For 12 isolates classified as E. quadrilineata, only 6 had been previously identified accordingly. E. nidulans was less susceptible than E. quadrilineata to amphotericin B (median MICs 2.5 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively, p<0.05); E. quadrilineata was less susceptible than E. nidulans to caspofungin (median MICs, 1.83 and 0.32 mg/L, respectively, p<0.05). These data indicate that sequence-based identification is more accurate than morphologic examination for identifying Emericella spp. and that correct species demarcation and in vitro susceptibility testing may affect patient management.

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Scanning electron microscopic images of ascospores of some Emericella isolates. A) E. quadrilineata V43-63; B) E. rugulosa V43-77; C) E. nidulans var. echinulata 4606. Scale bars represent 5 μm.
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Figure 3: Scanning electron microscopic images of ascospores of some Emericella isolates. A) E. quadrilineata V43-63; B) E. rugulosa V43-77; C) E. nidulans var. echinulata 4606. Scale bars represent 5 μm.

Mentions: A total of 4 isolates were classified as E. rugulosa, 1 of which had been previously reported as E. nidulans (10). A total of 4 isolates were identified as E. nidulans var. echinulata, 2 of which had caused invasive aspergillosis in patients with CGD and had been presumptively identified as E. nidulans. Scanning electron microscopy of the ascospores of some isolates supported their species assignment (JEOL 5600LV scanning electron microscope [JEOL, Tokyo, Japan] equipped with an Oxford CT1500 Cryostation [Oxford Instruments, Oxford, UK]) (Figure 3) (25).


Emericella quadrilineata as cause of invasive aspergillosis.

Verweij PE, Varga J, Houbraken J, Rijs AJ, Verduynlunel FM, Blijlevens NM, Shea YR, Holland SM, Warris A, Melchers WJ, Samson RA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Scanning electron microscopic images of ascospores of some Emericella isolates. A) E. quadrilineata V43-63; B) E. rugulosa V43-77; C) E. nidulans var. echinulata 4606. Scale bars represent 5 μm.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570940&req=5

Figure 3: Scanning electron microscopic images of ascospores of some Emericella isolates. A) E. quadrilineata V43-63; B) E. rugulosa V43-77; C) E. nidulans var. echinulata 4606. Scale bars represent 5 μm.
Mentions: A total of 4 isolates were classified as E. rugulosa, 1 of which had been previously reported as E. nidulans (10). A total of 4 isolates were identified as E. nidulans var. echinulata, 2 of which had caused invasive aspergillosis in patients with CGD and had been presumptively identified as E. nidulans. Scanning electron microscopy of the ascospores of some isolates supported their species assignment (JEOL 5600LV scanning electron microscope [JEOL, Tokyo, Japan] equipped with an Oxford CT1500 Cryostation [Oxford Instruments, Oxford, UK]) (Figure 3) (25).

Bottom Line: We noted a cluster of 4 cases of infection or colonization by Emericella spp., identified by sequence-based analysis as E. quadrilineata.For 12 isolates classified as E. quadrilineata, only 6 had been previously identified accordingly.These data indicate that sequence-based identification is more accurate than morphologic examination for identifying Emericella spp. and that correct species demarcation and in vitro susceptibility testing may affect patient management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. p.verweij@mmb.umcn.nl

ABSTRACT
We noted a cluster of 4 cases of infection or colonization by Emericella spp., identified by sequence-based analysis as E. quadrilineata. Sequence-based analysis of an international collection of 33 Emericella isolates identified 12 as E. nidulans, all 12 of which had previously been identified by morphologic methods as E. nidulans. For 12 isolates classified as E. quadrilineata, only 6 had been previously identified accordingly. E. nidulans was less susceptible than E. quadrilineata to amphotericin B (median MICs 2.5 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively, p<0.05); E. quadrilineata was less susceptible than E. nidulans to caspofungin (median MICs, 1.83 and 0.32 mg/L, respectively, p<0.05). These data indicate that sequence-based identification is more accurate than morphologic examination for identifying Emericella spp. and that correct species demarcation and in vitro susceptibility testing may affect patient management.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus