Limits...
“ In Dreams Begin Responsibilities ”

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

—William Butler Yeats “I woke with this marble head in my hands; / It exhausts my elbows and I don’t know where to put it down. / It was falling into the dream as I was coming out of the dream / So our life became one and it will be very difficult for it to separate again,” wrote George Seferis about his relationship with art from antiquity... Repeated vertical blows shattered crystals deep into the stone, altering the outer gloss... Because statues were painted, the opaque surface benefited pigment application... The best-known of these figures, Moschophoros (calf-bearer), on this month’s cover, represented the donor, a nobleman named Romvos as inscribed on the base... The figure, found in fragments on the grounds of the Acropolis near the sanctuary of the Temple of Athena, has none of the masklike quality of earlier kouri... Some feasts were Pan-Hellenic and included processions and athletic competitions. “There are sanctuaries of Hermes Kriophoros,” wrote Pausanias, describing the city of Tanagra. “..... The ritual turned into a feast, “while the people tasted the innards, burned the thighbones for the god” (Odyssey, Book III)... The contradictions inherent in religious sacrifice did not elude ritual participants, who ate little meat outside these religious feasts... The rituals may have expressed their uneasiness at killing animals for food and to appease the gods... Their ambivalence continued during the classical period, when even large domestic animals sustainable only in small numbers were used. “Our ancestors handed down to us the most powerful and prosperous community ... by performing the prescribed sacrifices,” wrote Athens orator Lysias, defending the practice. “It is therefore proper for us to offer the same ... if only for the sake of the success which has resulted from those rites”... And like other marvels from antiquity, it takes the initiative in speaking to us. “The statues are not the ruins,” wrote Seferis... Inasmuch as we die before we step forward, “—we are the ruins”.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Moschophoros (Calf-Bearer) attributed to Phaidimos. Statue of the patriot Romvos offering sacrificial calf to Athena. c. 570 bce. Marble. Height 165 cm. No. 624 Acropolis Museum, Athens, Greece
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570930&req=5

Fa: Moschophoros (Calf-Bearer) attributed to Phaidimos. Statue of the patriot Romvos offering sacrificial calf to Athena. c. 570 bce. Marble. Height 165 cm. No. 624 Acropolis Museum, Athens, Greece


“ In Dreams Begin Responsibilities ”
Moschophoros (Calf-Bearer) attributed to Phaidimos. Statue of the patriot Romvos offering sacrificial calf to Athena. c. 570 bce. Marble. Height 165 cm. No. 624 Acropolis Museum, Athens, Greece
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570930&req=5

Fa: Moschophoros (Calf-Bearer) attributed to Phaidimos. Statue of the patriot Romvos offering sacrificial calf to Athena. c. 570 bce. Marble. Height 165 cm. No. 624 Acropolis Museum, Athens, Greece

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

—William Butler Yeats “I woke with this marble head in my hands; / It exhausts my elbows and I don’t know where to put it down. / It was falling into the dream as I was coming out of the dream / So our life became one and it will be very difficult for it to separate again,” wrote George Seferis about his relationship with art from antiquity... Repeated vertical blows shattered crystals deep into the stone, altering the outer gloss... Because statues were painted, the opaque surface benefited pigment application... The best-known of these figures, Moschophoros (calf-bearer), on this month’s cover, represented the donor, a nobleman named Romvos as inscribed on the base... The figure, found in fragments on the grounds of the Acropolis near the sanctuary of the Temple of Athena, has none of the masklike quality of earlier kouri... Some feasts were Pan-Hellenic and included processions and athletic competitions. “There are sanctuaries of Hermes Kriophoros,” wrote Pausanias, describing the city of Tanagra. “..... The ritual turned into a feast, “while the people tasted the innards, burned the thighbones for the god” (Odyssey, Book III)... The contradictions inherent in religious sacrifice did not elude ritual participants, who ate little meat outside these religious feasts... The rituals may have expressed their uneasiness at killing animals for food and to appease the gods... Their ambivalence continued during the classical period, when even large domestic animals sustainable only in small numbers were used. “Our ancestors handed down to us the most powerful and prosperous community ... by performing the prescribed sacrifices,” wrote Athens orator Lysias, defending the practice. “It is therefore proper for us to offer the same ... if only for the sake of the success which has resulted from those rites”... And like other marvels from antiquity, it takes the initiative in speaking to us. “The statues are not the ruins,” wrote Seferis... Inasmuch as we die before we step forward, “—we are the ruins”.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus