Limits...
Chagas disease, France.

Lescure FX, Canestri A, Melliez H, Jauréguiberry S, Develoux M, Dorent R, Guiard-Schmid JB, Bonnard P, Ajana F, Rolla V, Carlier Y, Gay F, Elghouzzi MH, Danis M, Pialoux G - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Chagas disease (CD) is endemic to Latin America; its prevalence is highest in Bolivia.CD is sometimes seen in the United States and Canada among migrants from Latin America, whereas it is rare in Europe.We report 9 cases of imported CD in France from 2004 to 2006.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hôpital Tenon AP-HP, Paris, France. xavier.lescure@tnn.aphp.fr

ABSTRACT
Chagas disease (CD) is endemic to Latin America; its prevalence is highest in Bolivia. CD is sometimes seen in the United States and Canada among migrants from Latin America, whereas it is rare in Europe. We report 9 cases of imported CD in France from 2004 to 2006.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Romaña sign. Photo of female patient from French Guiana who lives in a metropolitan area of France. She had returned to Maripassoula to visit her parents during the holidays between July 13, 2004, and September 3, 2004. When the patient sought treatment on September 3, 2004, she had fever and unilateral periorbital edema.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570909&req=5

Figure 1: Romaña sign. Photo of female patient from French Guiana who lives in a metropolitan area of France. She had returned to Maripassoula to visit her parents during the holidays between July 13, 2004, and September 3, 2004. When the patient sought treatment on September 3, 2004, she had fever and unilateral periorbital edema.

Mentions: Nine cases of Chagas disease (CD), although rare in France, have been diagnosed in the country from 2004 through 2006 (Appendix Table). These included 1 case of acute Chagas myocarditis (ACM), 4 cases of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), and 4 cases of indeterminate chronic Chagas (ICC) (asymptomatic patients seropositive for Trypanosoma cruzi) (1). The ACM case involved an otherwise healthy 26-year-old woman who was hospitalized in September 2004 when she returned from a 2-month stay in French Guiana. Her symptoms included fever, headache, photophobia, intermittent chest pain, and arthromyalgia. Physical examination showed a typical Romaña sign, i.e., unilateral periorbital swelling (Figure). No abnormalities were found on clinical workup; blood smears and cultures were negative. Results of lumbar puncture, chest radiography, and echocardiography were also negative. The electrocardiogram (ECG) showed anterior ST-segment depression. A smear of a blister adjacent to the eye showing the Romaña sign yielded T. cruzi on direct examination. PCR was not performed. The patient was treated orally with benznidazole, 150 mg twice a day, and had a good clinical response. Benznidazole was discontinued after 7 weeks because peripheral neuropathy had developed. T. cruzi serologic results remained negative until 4 months after ACM, either because of a lack of sensitivity or because the patient was treated as soon as possible at the onset of symptoms.


Chagas disease, France.

Lescure FX, Canestri A, Melliez H, Jauréguiberry S, Develoux M, Dorent R, Guiard-Schmid JB, Bonnard P, Ajana F, Rolla V, Carlier Y, Gay F, Elghouzzi MH, Danis M, Pialoux G - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Romaña sign. Photo of female patient from French Guiana who lives in a metropolitan area of France. She had returned to Maripassoula to visit her parents during the holidays between July 13, 2004, and September 3, 2004. When the patient sought treatment on September 3, 2004, she had fever and unilateral periorbital edema.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570909&req=5

Figure 1: Romaña sign. Photo of female patient from French Guiana who lives in a metropolitan area of France. She had returned to Maripassoula to visit her parents during the holidays between July 13, 2004, and September 3, 2004. When the patient sought treatment on September 3, 2004, she had fever and unilateral periorbital edema.
Mentions: Nine cases of Chagas disease (CD), although rare in France, have been diagnosed in the country from 2004 through 2006 (Appendix Table). These included 1 case of acute Chagas myocarditis (ACM), 4 cases of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), and 4 cases of indeterminate chronic Chagas (ICC) (asymptomatic patients seropositive for Trypanosoma cruzi) (1). The ACM case involved an otherwise healthy 26-year-old woman who was hospitalized in September 2004 when she returned from a 2-month stay in French Guiana. Her symptoms included fever, headache, photophobia, intermittent chest pain, and arthromyalgia. Physical examination showed a typical Romaña sign, i.e., unilateral periorbital swelling (Figure). No abnormalities were found on clinical workup; blood smears and cultures were negative. Results of lumbar puncture, chest radiography, and echocardiography were also negative. The electrocardiogram (ECG) showed anterior ST-segment depression. A smear of a blister adjacent to the eye showing the Romaña sign yielded T. cruzi on direct examination. PCR was not performed. The patient was treated orally with benznidazole, 150 mg twice a day, and had a good clinical response. Benznidazole was discontinued after 7 weeks because peripheral neuropathy had developed. T. cruzi serologic results remained negative until 4 months after ACM, either because of a lack of sensitivity or because the patient was treated as soon as possible at the onset of symptoms.

Bottom Line: Chagas disease (CD) is endemic to Latin America; its prevalence is highest in Bolivia.CD is sometimes seen in the United States and Canada among migrants from Latin America, whereas it is rare in Europe.We report 9 cases of imported CD in France from 2004 to 2006.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hôpital Tenon AP-HP, Paris, France. xavier.lescure@tnn.aphp.fr

ABSTRACT
Chagas disease (CD) is endemic to Latin America; its prevalence is highest in Bolivia. CD is sometimes seen in the United States and Canada among migrants from Latin America, whereas it is rare in Europe. We report 9 cases of imported CD in France from 2004 to 2006.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus