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Kala-azar epidemiology and control, southern Sudan.

Kolaczinski JH, Hope A, Ruiz JA, Rumunu J, Richer M, Seaman J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Southern Sudan is one of the areas in eastern Africa most affected by visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar), but lack of security and funds has hampered control.Since 2005, the return of stability has opened up new opportunities to expand existing interventions and introduce new ones.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Malaria Consortium, Kampala, Uganda. j.kolaczinski@malariaconsortium.org

ABSTRACT
Southern Sudan is one of the areas in eastern Africa most affected by visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar), but lack of security and funds has hampered control. Since 2005, the return of stability has opened up new opportunities to expand existing interventions and introduce new ones.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Total annual number of kala-azar cases in Southern Sudan reported to the World Health Organization, 1989–2006.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 2: Total annual number of kala-azar cases in Southern Sudan reported to the World Health Organization, 1989–2006.

Mentions: Passive case-detection data on kala-azar in Southern Sudan, collected by the World Health Organization (WHO) since 1989, indicate a cyclical pattern of kala-azar with considerable variation in the caseload from year to year (Figure 2). The dynamics presented in Figure 2 also suggest that Southern Sudan is currently between epidemics and provide a warning that cases may rise dramatically in coming years. In 2006, a total of 1,117 cases were reported, 65.4% of which were primary cases; the remainder were either relapses or cases of post–kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. From January through June 2007, a total of 492 cases were reported, of which 88.2% were primary cases. The 5 locations accounting for 74.2% of the primary cases in 2007 were Malakal (n = 83), Ulang (n = 72), Nasir (n = 63), and Kiechkuon (n = 25) in Upper Nile state and Lankien (n = 79) in northern Jonglei state. Since 2002, the case-fatality rate recorded at healthcare facilities has been 4%–6%.


Kala-azar epidemiology and control, southern Sudan.

Kolaczinski JH, Hope A, Ruiz JA, Rumunu J, Richer M, Seaman J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Total annual number of kala-azar cases in Southern Sudan reported to the World Health Organization, 1989–2006.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570907&req=5

Figure 2: Total annual number of kala-azar cases in Southern Sudan reported to the World Health Organization, 1989–2006.
Mentions: Passive case-detection data on kala-azar in Southern Sudan, collected by the World Health Organization (WHO) since 1989, indicate a cyclical pattern of kala-azar with considerable variation in the caseload from year to year (Figure 2). The dynamics presented in Figure 2 also suggest that Southern Sudan is currently between epidemics and provide a warning that cases may rise dramatically in coming years. In 2006, a total of 1,117 cases were reported, 65.4% of which were primary cases; the remainder were either relapses or cases of post–kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. From January through June 2007, a total of 492 cases were reported, of which 88.2% were primary cases. The 5 locations accounting for 74.2% of the primary cases in 2007 were Malakal (n = 83), Ulang (n = 72), Nasir (n = 63), and Kiechkuon (n = 25) in Upper Nile state and Lankien (n = 79) in northern Jonglei state. Since 2002, the case-fatality rate recorded at healthcare facilities has been 4%–6%.

Bottom Line: Southern Sudan is one of the areas in eastern Africa most affected by visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar), but lack of security and funds has hampered control.Since 2005, the return of stability has opened up new opportunities to expand existing interventions and introduce new ones.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Malaria Consortium, Kampala, Uganda. j.kolaczinski@malariaconsortium.org

ABSTRACT
Southern Sudan is one of the areas in eastern Africa most affected by visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar), but lack of security and funds has hampered control. Since 2005, the return of stability has opened up new opportunities to expand existing interventions and introduce new ones.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus