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Detection and prevalence patterns of group I coronaviruses in bats, northern Germany.

Gloza-Rausch F, Ipsen A, Seebens A, Göttsche M, Panning M, Drexler JF, Petersen N, Annan A, Grywna K, Müller M, Pfefferle S, Drosten C - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: The overall prevalence was 9.8%.The lineages formed a monophyletic clade of bat coronaviruses found in northern Germany.The virus is probably maintained on the population level by amplification and transmission in maternity colonies, rather than being maintained in individual bats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Bat Protection and Information, Bad Segeberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We tested 315 bats from 7 different bat species in northern Germany for coronaviruses by reverse transcription-PCR. The overall prevalence was 9.8%. There were 4 lineages of group I coronaviruses in association with 4 different species of verspertilionid bats (Myotis dasycneme, M. daubentonii, Pipistrellus nathusii, P. pygmaeus). The lineages formed a monophyletic clade of bat coronaviruses found in northern Germany. The clade of bat coronaviruses have a sister relationship with a clade of Chinese type I coronaviruses that were also associated with the Myotis genus (M. ricketti). Young age and ongoing lactation, but not sex or existing gravidity, correlated significantly with coronavirus detection. The virus is probably maintained on the population level by amplification and transmission in maternity colonies, rather than being maintained in individual bats.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Phlyogenetic analysis of northern German bat coronaviruses (CoV) (lineages 1–4) and related group I CoVs from bats and other mammals. Analyses were conducted in MEGA4 (32), by using the neighbor-joining algorithm with Kimura correction and a bootstrap test of phylogeny. Numbers at nodes denote bootstrap values as percentage of 1,000 repetitive analyses. The phylogeny is rooted with a Leopard CoV, ALC/GX/F230/06 (33). The column on the right shows bat CoV prototype strain names or the designations of type strains of established mammalian CoV species.
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Figure 2: Phlyogenetic analysis of northern German bat coronaviruses (CoV) (lineages 1–4) and related group I CoVs from bats and other mammals. Analyses were conducted in MEGA4 (32), by using the neighbor-joining algorithm with Kimura correction and a bootstrap test of phylogeny. Numbers at nodes denote bootstrap values as percentage of 1,000 repetitive analyses. The phylogeny is rooted with a Leopard CoV, ALC/GX/F230/06 (33). The column on the right shows bat CoV prototype strain names or the designations of type strains of established mammalian CoV species.

Mentions: Sequences of PCR products from all coronaviruses were determined. As shown in Figure 2, the northern German viruses clustered in 1 large monophyletic clade containing no other previously known virus. In a sister relationship was a clade of viruses from Chinese bats with prototype strains A701/2005, HKU6 and A821/2005 (18,34). These viruses were all detected in M. ricketti, which belongs to the same subgenus (Leuconoe Boie) as M. dasycneme and uses a similar ecologic niche (35–37).


Detection and prevalence patterns of group I coronaviruses in bats, northern Germany.

Gloza-Rausch F, Ipsen A, Seebens A, Göttsche M, Panning M, Drexler JF, Petersen N, Annan A, Grywna K, Müller M, Pfefferle S, Drosten C - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Phlyogenetic analysis of northern German bat coronaviruses (CoV) (lineages 1–4) and related group I CoVs from bats and other mammals. Analyses were conducted in MEGA4 (32), by using the neighbor-joining algorithm with Kimura correction and a bootstrap test of phylogeny. Numbers at nodes denote bootstrap values as percentage of 1,000 repetitive analyses. The phylogeny is rooted with a Leopard CoV, ALC/GX/F230/06 (33). The column on the right shows bat CoV prototype strain names or the designations of type strains of established mammalian CoV species.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570906&req=5

Figure 2: Phlyogenetic analysis of northern German bat coronaviruses (CoV) (lineages 1–4) and related group I CoVs from bats and other mammals. Analyses were conducted in MEGA4 (32), by using the neighbor-joining algorithm with Kimura correction and a bootstrap test of phylogeny. Numbers at nodes denote bootstrap values as percentage of 1,000 repetitive analyses. The phylogeny is rooted with a Leopard CoV, ALC/GX/F230/06 (33). The column on the right shows bat CoV prototype strain names or the designations of type strains of established mammalian CoV species.
Mentions: Sequences of PCR products from all coronaviruses were determined. As shown in Figure 2, the northern German viruses clustered in 1 large monophyletic clade containing no other previously known virus. In a sister relationship was a clade of viruses from Chinese bats with prototype strains A701/2005, HKU6 and A821/2005 (18,34). These viruses were all detected in M. ricketti, which belongs to the same subgenus (Leuconoe Boie) as M. dasycneme and uses a similar ecologic niche (35–37).

Bottom Line: The overall prevalence was 9.8%.The lineages formed a monophyletic clade of bat coronaviruses found in northern Germany.The virus is probably maintained on the population level by amplification and transmission in maternity colonies, rather than being maintained in individual bats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Bat Protection and Information, Bad Segeberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We tested 315 bats from 7 different bat species in northern Germany for coronaviruses by reverse transcription-PCR. The overall prevalence was 9.8%. There were 4 lineages of group I coronaviruses in association with 4 different species of verspertilionid bats (Myotis dasycneme, M. daubentonii, Pipistrellus nathusii, P. pygmaeus). The lineages formed a monophyletic clade of bat coronaviruses found in northern Germany. The clade of bat coronaviruses have a sister relationship with a clade of Chinese type I coronaviruses that were also associated with the Myotis genus (M. ricketti). Young age and ongoing lactation, but not sex or existing gravidity, correlated significantly with coronavirus detection. The virus is probably maintained on the population level by amplification and transmission in maternity colonies, rather than being maintained in individual bats.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus