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Exposure to novel parainfluenza virus and clinical relevance in 2 bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) populations.

Venn-Watson S, Rivera R, Smith CR, Saliki JT, Caseltine S, St Leger J, Yochem P, Wells RS, Nollens H - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Parainfluenza virus (PIV) is a leading cause of respiratory infections in humans.Seroprevalence surveys were conducted on 114 healthy bottlenose dolphins in Florida and California.When the most conservative interpretation of positive was used, 11.4% of healthy dolphins were antibody positive, 29.8% were negative, and 58.8% were inconclusive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: US Navy Marine Mammal Program, SSC San Diego, 53560 Hull St, Code 71510, San Diego, CA 92152, USA. stephanie.wong@navy.mil

ABSTRACT
Parainfluenza virus (PIV) is a leading cause of respiratory infections in humans. A novel virus closely related to human and bovine parainfluenza viruses types 3 (HPIV-3 and BPIV-3), named Tursiops truncatus parainfluenza virus type 1 (TtPIV-1), was isolated from a dolphin with respiratory disease. We developed a dolphin-specific ELISA to measure acute- and convalescent-phase PIV antibodies in dolphins during 1999-2006 with hemograms similar to that of the positive control. PIV seroconversion occurred concurrently with an abnormal hemogram in 22 animals, of which 7 (31.8%) had respiratory signs. Seroprevalence surveys were conducted on 114 healthy bottlenose dolphins in Florida and California. When the most conservative interpretation of positive was used, 11.4% of healthy dolphins were antibody positive, 29.8% were negative, and 58.8% were inconclusive. PIV appears to be a common marine mammal virus that may be of human health interest because of the similarity of TtPIV-1 to BPIV-3 and HPIV-3.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Sample series of parainfluenza virus (PIV) antibody optical density in the positive control bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) during time of respiratory illness and multiple positive viral isolations from grossly affected lung.
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Figure 1: Sample series of parainfluenza virus (PIV) antibody optical density in the positive control bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) during time of respiratory illness and multiple positive viral isolations from grossly affected lung.

Mentions: PIV serum antibody OD405 levels were determined in a dolphin from which TtPIV-1 was successfully isolated from antemortem and postmortem lung samples. Low PIV antibody levels appeared to be present 300 days before illness, and rising antibody levels were detected during the course of TtPIV-1–associated respiratory illness (Figure 1).


Exposure to novel parainfluenza virus and clinical relevance in 2 bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) populations.

Venn-Watson S, Rivera R, Smith CR, Saliki JT, Caseltine S, St Leger J, Yochem P, Wells RS, Nollens H - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Sample series of parainfluenza virus (PIV) antibody optical density in the positive control bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) during time of respiratory illness and multiple positive viral isolations from grossly affected lung.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570820&req=5

Figure 1: Sample series of parainfluenza virus (PIV) antibody optical density in the positive control bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) during time of respiratory illness and multiple positive viral isolations from grossly affected lung.
Mentions: PIV serum antibody OD405 levels were determined in a dolphin from which TtPIV-1 was successfully isolated from antemortem and postmortem lung samples. Low PIV antibody levels appeared to be present 300 days before illness, and rising antibody levels were detected during the course of TtPIV-1–associated respiratory illness (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Parainfluenza virus (PIV) is a leading cause of respiratory infections in humans.Seroprevalence surveys were conducted on 114 healthy bottlenose dolphins in Florida and California.When the most conservative interpretation of positive was used, 11.4% of healthy dolphins were antibody positive, 29.8% were negative, and 58.8% were inconclusive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: US Navy Marine Mammal Program, SSC San Diego, 53560 Hull St, Code 71510, San Diego, CA 92152, USA. stephanie.wong@navy.mil

ABSTRACT
Parainfluenza virus (PIV) is a leading cause of respiratory infections in humans. A novel virus closely related to human and bovine parainfluenza viruses types 3 (HPIV-3 and BPIV-3), named Tursiops truncatus parainfluenza virus type 1 (TtPIV-1), was isolated from a dolphin with respiratory disease. We developed a dolphin-specific ELISA to measure acute- and convalescent-phase PIV antibodies in dolphins during 1999-2006 with hemograms similar to that of the positive control. PIV seroconversion occurred concurrently with an abnormal hemogram in 22 animals, of which 7 (31.8%) had respiratory signs. Seroprevalence surveys were conducted on 114 healthy bottlenose dolphins in Florida and California. When the most conservative interpretation of positive was used, 11.4% of healthy dolphins were antibody positive, 29.8% were negative, and 58.8% were inconclusive. PIV appears to be a common marine mammal virus that may be of human health interest because of the similarity of TtPIV-1 to BPIV-3 and HPIV-3.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus