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Hygeia as Muse

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“A line will take us hours maybe; / Yet if it does not seem a moment’s thought, / Our stitching and unstitching has been naught,” wrote William Butler Yeats (1865–1939) about the creative process... Celebrated can-can dancer Jane Avril and Louise Weber, dubbed La Goulue (the glutton, for guzzling drinks), attracted huge crowds with decadent performances... Lautrec was fascinated by human behavior but painted those who interested him: working women; cabaret proprietors; entertainers, whose brilliant if transient careers he observed dispassionately... His sparse palette and bold, assured brushstrokes captured the essence of nightlife, the glare of the stage, the shadows of gaiety, the despair and loneliness of crowds, the plight of the working poor, the physical pain of dancers as well as their agility... The technique, practiced by many greats (Alphonse Mucha, Pablo Picasso, Jasper Johns) originated in 1796... Based on the principle that oil and water do not mix, it uses both to form a print on a smooth surface... Lautrec’s first effort and his best, Moulin Rouge: La Goulue, was an overnight sensation, pushing him and La Goulue to stardom... Amusement, fanatically pursued by the crowds in dance halls and by Lautrec himself, at times, equals living on the edge... This need, to break barriers, showcase new work, and focus on the problems of humanity, lives on today in scientific conferences... There, ideas mingle with personalities, and bit by bit, solutions are worked out for as the poet put it, “It’s certain there is no fine thing / Since Adam’s fall but needs much labouring”... Hygeia is a capricious muse... She eludes the compromised artist toiling in pain and without physical charm but inspires the globe-trotting scientist gathering in today’s venues to blast conventional wisdom and seek solutions to emerging infectious disease.

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Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901). At the Moulin Rouge: The Dance (1890). Oil on canvas (115.6 cm × 149.9 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Henry P. Mcllhenny Collection in memory of Frances P. Mcllhenny, 1986
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Fa: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901). At the Moulin Rouge: The Dance (1890). Oil on canvas (115.6 cm × 149.9 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Henry P. Mcllhenny Collection in memory of Frances P. Mcllhenny, 1986


Hygeia as Muse
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901). At the Moulin Rouge: The Dance (1890). Oil on canvas (115.6 cm × 149.9 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Henry P. Mcllhenny Collection in memory of Frances P. Mcllhenny, 1986
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570819&req=5

Fa: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901). At the Moulin Rouge: The Dance (1890). Oil on canvas (115.6 cm × 149.9 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Henry P. Mcllhenny Collection in memory of Frances P. Mcllhenny, 1986

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

“A line will take us hours maybe; / Yet if it does not seem a moment’s thought, / Our stitching and unstitching has been naught,” wrote William Butler Yeats (1865–1939) about the creative process... Celebrated can-can dancer Jane Avril and Louise Weber, dubbed La Goulue (the glutton, for guzzling drinks), attracted huge crowds with decadent performances... Lautrec was fascinated by human behavior but painted those who interested him: working women; cabaret proprietors; entertainers, whose brilliant if transient careers he observed dispassionately... His sparse palette and bold, assured brushstrokes captured the essence of nightlife, the glare of the stage, the shadows of gaiety, the despair and loneliness of crowds, the plight of the working poor, the physical pain of dancers as well as their agility... The technique, practiced by many greats (Alphonse Mucha, Pablo Picasso, Jasper Johns) originated in 1796... Based on the principle that oil and water do not mix, it uses both to form a print on a smooth surface... Lautrec’s first effort and his best, Moulin Rouge: La Goulue, was an overnight sensation, pushing him and La Goulue to stardom... Amusement, fanatically pursued by the crowds in dance halls and by Lautrec himself, at times, equals living on the edge... This need, to break barriers, showcase new work, and focus on the problems of humanity, lives on today in scientific conferences... There, ideas mingle with personalities, and bit by bit, solutions are worked out for as the poet put it, “It’s certain there is no fine thing / Since Adam’s fall but needs much labouring”... Hygeia is a capricious muse... She eludes the compromised artist toiling in pain and without physical charm but inspires the globe-trotting scientist gathering in today’s venues to blast conventional wisdom and seek solutions to emerging infectious disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus