Limits...
Transmission of equine influenza virus to English foxhounds.

Daly JM, Blunden AS, Macrae S, Miller J, Bowman SJ, Kolodziejek J, Nowotny N, Smith KC - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: We retrospectively demonstrated that an outbreak of severe respiratory disease in a pack of English foxhounds in the United Kingdom in September 2002 was caused by an equine influenza A virus (H3N8).We also demonstrated that canine respiratory tissue possesses the relevant receptors for infection with equine influenza virus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Health Trust, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk, UK. jshaw@liverpool.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
We retrospectively demonstrated that an outbreak of severe respiratory disease in a pack of English foxhounds in the United Kingdom in September 2002 was caused by an equine influenza A virus (H3N8). We also demonstrated that canine respiratory tissue possesses the relevant receptors for infection with equine influenza virus.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Immunohistochemical staining for equine influenza A virus (brown stain) in sections of respiratory tissue from English foxhounds involved in 2002 respiratory disease outbreak, United Kingdom. A) Case 1, showing focal staining of an apparently necrotic bronchiole in an area of pneumonia; magnification x100. B) Case 2, showing a large amount of staining throughout the epithelium and inflammatory cells present in the brush border; magnification x200; hematoxylin counterstain.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570814&req=5

Figure 1: Immunohistochemical staining for equine influenza A virus (brown stain) in sections of respiratory tissue from English foxhounds involved in 2002 respiratory disease outbreak, United Kingdom. A) Case 1, showing focal staining of an apparently necrotic bronchiole in an area of pneumonia; magnification x100. B) Case 2, showing a large amount of staining throughout the epithelium and inflammatory cells present in the brush border; magnification x200; hematoxylin counterstain.

Mentions: An immunohistochemical test to detect influenza A virus that used equine influenza–specific rabbit polyclonal antiserum was applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from the 2 hounds that were examined postmortem in 2002 (3). Immunostaining of lung tissue showed positive staining in areas of pneumonic change; infected cells had the morphology of epithelial cells and macrophages (Figure 1). Immunostaining of visceral tissues (lung, liver, spleen, myocardium, intestine, pancreas, and oropharynx) was negative.


Transmission of equine influenza virus to English foxhounds.

Daly JM, Blunden AS, Macrae S, Miller J, Bowman SJ, Kolodziejek J, Nowotny N, Smith KC - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Immunohistochemical staining for equine influenza A virus (brown stain) in sections of respiratory tissue from English foxhounds involved in 2002 respiratory disease outbreak, United Kingdom. A) Case 1, showing focal staining of an apparently necrotic bronchiole in an area of pneumonia; magnification x100. B) Case 2, showing a large amount of staining throughout the epithelium and inflammatory cells present in the brush border; magnification x200; hematoxylin counterstain.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570814&req=5

Figure 1: Immunohistochemical staining for equine influenza A virus (brown stain) in sections of respiratory tissue from English foxhounds involved in 2002 respiratory disease outbreak, United Kingdom. A) Case 1, showing focal staining of an apparently necrotic bronchiole in an area of pneumonia; magnification x100. B) Case 2, showing a large amount of staining throughout the epithelium and inflammatory cells present in the brush border; magnification x200; hematoxylin counterstain.
Mentions: An immunohistochemical test to detect influenza A virus that used equine influenza–specific rabbit polyclonal antiserum was applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from the 2 hounds that were examined postmortem in 2002 (3). Immunostaining of lung tissue showed positive staining in areas of pneumonic change; infected cells had the morphology of epithelial cells and macrophages (Figure 1). Immunostaining of visceral tissues (lung, liver, spleen, myocardium, intestine, pancreas, and oropharynx) was negative.

Bottom Line: We retrospectively demonstrated that an outbreak of severe respiratory disease in a pack of English foxhounds in the United Kingdom in September 2002 was caused by an equine influenza A virus (H3N8).We also demonstrated that canine respiratory tissue possesses the relevant receptors for infection with equine influenza virus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Health Trust, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk, UK. jshaw@liverpool.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
We retrospectively demonstrated that an outbreak of severe respiratory disease in a pack of English foxhounds in the United Kingdom in September 2002 was caused by an equine influenza A virus (H3N8). We also demonstrated that canine respiratory tissue possesses the relevant receptors for infection with equine influenza virus.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus