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Screening pneumonia patients for mimivirus.

Dare RK, Chittaganpitch M, Erdman DD - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APM), a virus of free-living amebae, has reportedly caused human respiratory disease.Using 2 newly developed real-time PCR assays, we screened 496 respiratory specimens from 9 pneumonia-patient populations for APM.This virus was not detected in any specimen, which suggests it is not a common respiratory pathogen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. dde1@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APM), a virus of free-living amebae, has reportedly caused human respiratory disease. Using 2 newly developed real-time PCR assays, we screened 496 respiratory specimens from 9 pneumonia-patient populations for APM. This virus was not detected in any specimen, which suggests it is not a common respiratory pathogen.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Real-time PCR amplification plots and standard curves for Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APM)-396 (A, A′) and APM-596 (B, B’). Linear amplification was achieved over 6 logs for both assays over 5 × 106 to 5 × 101 copies of plasmid DNA. RFU, relative fluorescence units.
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Figure 1: Real-time PCR amplification plots and standard curves for Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APM)-396 (A, A′) and APM-596 (B, B’). Linear amplification was achieved over 6 logs for both assays over 5 × 106 to 5 × 101 copies of plasmid DNA. RFU, relative fluorescence units.

Mentions: The L396 and R596 real-time PCR assays could detect as few as 10 copies of plasmid DNA per reaction with amplification efficiencies of 99.6% [slope –3.33 and r2 = 0.99] (Figure 1, left panels) and 99.2% [slope –3.34 and r2 = 1.00] (Figure 1, right panels), respectively. No amplification was obtained by either assay with pooled total nucleic acid extracts from respiratory samples from healthy humans or from other common DNA respiratory viruses, including adenovirus, human bocavirus, or herpesviruses.


Screening pneumonia patients for mimivirus.

Dare RK, Chittaganpitch M, Erdman DD - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Real-time PCR amplification plots and standard curves for Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APM)-396 (A, A′) and APM-596 (B, B’). Linear amplification was achieved over 6 logs for both assays over 5 × 106 to 5 × 101 copies of plasmid DNA. RFU, relative fluorescence units.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570813&req=5

Figure 1: Real-time PCR amplification plots and standard curves for Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APM)-396 (A, A′) and APM-596 (B, B’). Linear amplification was achieved over 6 logs for both assays over 5 × 106 to 5 × 101 copies of plasmid DNA. RFU, relative fluorescence units.
Mentions: The L396 and R596 real-time PCR assays could detect as few as 10 copies of plasmid DNA per reaction with amplification efficiencies of 99.6% [slope –3.33 and r2 = 0.99] (Figure 1, left panels) and 99.2% [slope –3.34 and r2 = 1.00] (Figure 1, right panels), respectively. No amplification was obtained by either assay with pooled total nucleic acid extracts from respiratory samples from healthy humans or from other common DNA respiratory viruses, including adenovirus, human bocavirus, or herpesviruses.

Bottom Line: Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APM), a virus of free-living amebae, has reportedly caused human respiratory disease.Using 2 newly developed real-time PCR assays, we screened 496 respiratory specimens from 9 pneumonia-patient populations for APM.This virus was not detected in any specimen, which suggests it is not a common respiratory pathogen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. dde1@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APM), a virus of free-living amebae, has reportedly caused human respiratory disease. Using 2 newly developed real-time PCR assays, we screened 496 respiratory specimens from 9 pneumonia-patient populations for APM. This virus was not detected in any specimen, which suggests it is not a common respiratory pathogen.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus