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Epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria in patients without HIV infection, New York City.

Bodle EE, Cunningham JA, Della-Latta P, Schluger NW, Saiman L - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: The difference between demographic characteristics of case-patients in our study (66% female, 61% white, and 59% > 60 years of age) and those of the base population as determined by regional census data was statistically significant.NTM disease in patients without HIV is increasing.Laboratory-based surveillance may be useful for detecting non-MAC and non-respiratory tract disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.

ABSTRACT
We reviewed medical records of patients without known HIV and with positive cultures for nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated during 2000-2003 from 1 large hospital in New York, New York. Overall, 505 patients had positive NTM cultures; 119 (24%) met the criteria for NTM disease. The difference between demographic characteristics of case-patients in our study (66% female, 61% white, and 59% > 60 years of age) and those of the base population as determined by regional census data was statistically significant. Estimated incidences for positive cultures, all disease, and respiratory tract disease were 17.7, 2.7, and 2.0 per 100,000 persons, respectively. More patients with rapidly growing mycobacteria (61%), Mycobacterium kansasii (70%), or M. marinum (100%) met criteria for disease than did patients with M. avium complex (MAC) (27%, (p < 0.01). NTM disease in patients without HIV is increasing. Laboratory-based surveillance may be useful for detecting non-MAC and non-respiratory tract disease.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of patient selection for cases of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) colonization and NTM disease among patients without HIV infection, New York–Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH), Columbia University Medical Center, 2000–2003.
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Figure 1: Flowchart of patient selection for cases of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) colonization and NTM disease among patients without HIV infection, New York–Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH), Columbia University Medical Center, 2000–2003.

Mentions: During the 4-year study period, the clinical microbiology laboratory identified 769 patients with at least 1 positive NTM culture. Of these, 264 were excluded from further analysis by electronic purge of HIV-infected patients as previously described (Figure 1). The remaining 505 study patients had 820 positive NTM cultures; 282 (56%) were hospitalized when their first positive NTM culture was obtained. MAC and the rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) species were most common, isolated from 84% (n = 422) and 9% (n = 45) of patients, respectively (Table 1).


Epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria in patients without HIV infection, New York City.

Bodle EE, Cunningham JA, Della-Latta P, Schluger NW, Saiman L - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Flowchart of patient selection for cases of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) colonization and NTM disease among patients without HIV infection, New York–Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH), Columbia University Medical Center, 2000–2003.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570812&req=5

Figure 1: Flowchart of patient selection for cases of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) colonization and NTM disease among patients without HIV infection, New York–Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH), Columbia University Medical Center, 2000–2003.
Mentions: During the 4-year study period, the clinical microbiology laboratory identified 769 patients with at least 1 positive NTM culture. Of these, 264 were excluded from further analysis by electronic purge of HIV-infected patients as previously described (Figure 1). The remaining 505 study patients had 820 positive NTM cultures; 282 (56%) were hospitalized when their first positive NTM culture was obtained. MAC and the rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) species were most common, isolated from 84% (n = 422) and 9% (n = 45) of patients, respectively (Table 1).

Bottom Line: The difference between demographic characteristics of case-patients in our study (66% female, 61% white, and 59% > 60 years of age) and those of the base population as determined by regional census data was statistically significant.NTM disease in patients without HIV is increasing.Laboratory-based surveillance may be useful for detecting non-MAC and non-respiratory tract disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.

ABSTRACT
We reviewed medical records of patients without known HIV and with positive cultures for nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated during 2000-2003 from 1 large hospital in New York, New York. Overall, 505 patients had positive NTM cultures; 119 (24%) met the criteria for NTM disease. The difference between demographic characteristics of case-patients in our study (66% female, 61% white, and 59% > 60 years of age) and those of the base population as determined by regional census data was statistically significant. Estimated incidences for positive cultures, all disease, and respiratory tract disease were 17.7, 2.7, and 2.0 per 100,000 persons, respectively. More patients with rapidly growing mycobacteria (61%), Mycobacterium kansasii (70%), or M. marinum (100%) met criteria for disease than did patients with M. avium complex (MAC) (27%, (p < 0.01). NTM disease in patients without HIV is increasing. Laboratory-based surveillance may be useful for detecting non-MAC and non-respiratory tract disease.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus