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New insight into the colonization processes of common voles: inferences from molecular and fossil evidence.

Tougard C, Renvoisé E, Petitjean A, Quéré JP - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: Elucidating the colonization processes associated with Quaternary climatic cycles is important in order to understand the distribution of biodiversity and the evolutionary potential of temperate plant and animal species.Species can experience heterogeneous evolutionary histories over their geographic range.Multidisciplinary approaches should therefore be preferentially chosen in prospective studies, the better to understand the impact of climatic change on past and present biodiversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UMR CNRS/uB 5561 Biogéosciences-Dijon, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, France. Christelle.Tougard@univ-montp2.fr

ABSTRACT
Elucidating the colonization processes associated with Quaternary climatic cycles is important in order to understand the distribution of biodiversity and the evolutionary potential of temperate plant and animal species. In Europe, general evolutionary scenarios have been defined from genetic evidence. Recently, these scenarios have been challenged with genetic as well as fossil data. The origins of the modern distributions of most temperate plant and animal species could predate the Last Glacial Maximum. The glacial survival of such populations may have occurred in either southern (Mediterranean regions) and/or northern (Carpathians) refugia. Here, a phylogeographic analysis of a widespread European small mammal (Microtus arvalis) is conducted with a multidisciplinary approach. Genetic, fossil and ecological traits are used to assess the evolutionary history of this vole. Regardless of whether the European distribution of the five previously identified evolutionary lineages is corroborated, this combined analysis brings to light several colonization processes of M. arvalis. The species' dispersal was relatively gradual with glacial survival in small favourable habitats in Western Europe (from Germany to Spain) while in the rest of Europe, because of periglacial conditions, dispersal was less regular with bottleneck events followed by postglacial expansions. Our study demonstrates that the evolutionary history of European temperate small mammals is indeed much more complex than previously suggested. Species can experience heterogeneous evolutionary histories over their geographic range. Multidisciplinary approaches should therefore be preferentially chosen in prospective studies, the better to understand the impact of climatic change on past and present biodiversity.

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Demographic history of Microtus arvalis inferred from cytochrome b gene dataset.Observed mismatch distributions (blue line) for the whole dataset (A) as well as the Western (B), Eastern (C) and Central (D) lineages are compared to expected distributions under a population growth-decline model (red line). Numbers of pairwise differences are on the X-axis, while relative frequencies are on the Y-axis.
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pone-0003532-g003: Demographic history of Microtus arvalis inferred from cytochrome b gene dataset.Observed mismatch distributions (blue line) for the whole dataset (A) as well as the Western (B), Eastern (C) and Central (D) lineages are compared to expected distributions under a population growth-decline model (red line). Numbers of pairwise differences are on the X-axis, while relative frequencies are on the Y-axis.

Mentions: Nucleotide and haplotype diversities, as well as total and net DNA divergences were calculated for each lineage (Table 1). The W lineage had the highest nucleotide diversity (1.31%), while the I lineage had the lowest (0.49%). Nucleotide diversity for the other lineages was between 0.53% and 0.62%. The haplotype diversity was relatively high and homogeneous, from 0.90 (Italian) to 1 (Freiburg). Total and net DNA divergences between lineages were estimated at 1.44–3.18% and 0.86–2.40%, respectively. The I lineage showed the highest value. The nucleotide diversity and net DNA divergence were in agreement with previously published analyses [6], [33]. Demographic histories were inferred by a pairwise mismatch distribution analysis [40] (Figure 3). This analysis, when applied to the whole dataset, showed a heterogeneous distribution suggesting long-term stability. As pooling differentiated samples may induce bias, the mismatch distribution analyses were also performed for the W, C and E lineages separately. The W lineage presented a heterogeneous distribution; the C and E lineages had a bell-shaped distribution, suggesting a sudden expansion of these populations. As for alternative topology hypotheses, there were too few samples available for the F and I lineages (respectively, 2 and 5) to obtain reliable results.


New insight into the colonization processes of common voles: inferences from molecular and fossil evidence.

Tougard C, Renvoisé E, Petitjean A, Quéré JP - PLoS ONE (2008)

Demographic history of Microtus arvalis inferred from cytochrome b gene dataset.Observed mismatch distributions (blue line) for the whole dataset (A) as well as the Western (B), Eastern (C) and Central (D) lineages are compared to expected distributions under a population growth-decline model (red line). Numbers of pairwise differences are on the X-axis, while relative frequencies are on the Y-axis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570793&req=5

pone-0003532-g003: Demographic history of Microtus arvalis inferred from cytochrome b gene dataset.Observed mismatch distributions (blue line) for the whole dataset (A) as well as the Western (B), Eastern (C) and Central (D) lineages are compared to expected distributions under a population growth-decline model (red line). Numbers of pairwise differences are on the X-axis, while relative frequencies are on the Y-axis.
Mentions: Nucleotide and haplotype diversities, as well as total and net DNA divergences were calculated for each lineage (Table 1). The W lineage had the highest nucleotide diversity (1.31%), while the I lineage had the lowest (0.49%). Nucleotide diversity for the other lineages was between 0.53% and 0.62%. The haplotype diversity was relatively high and homogeneous, from 0.90 (Italian) to 1 (Freiburg). Total and net DNA divergences between lineages were estimated at 1.44–3.18% and 0.86–2.40%, respectively. The I lineage showed the highest value. The nucleotide diversity and net DNA divergence were in agreement with previously published analyses [6], [33]. Demographic histories were inferred by a pairwise mismatch distribution analysis [40] (Figure 3). This analysis, when applied to the whole dataset, showed a heterogeneous distribution suggesting long-term stability. As pooling differentiated samples may induce bias, the mismatch distribution analyses were also performed for the W, C and E lineages separately. The W lineage presented a heterogeneous distribution; the C and E lineages had a bell-shaped distribution, suggesting a sudden expansion of these populations. As for alternative topology hypotheses, there were too few samples available for the F and I lineages (respectively, 2 and 5) to obtain reliable results.

Bottom Line: Elucidating the colonization processes associated with Quaternary climatic cycles is important in order to understand the distribution of biodiversity and the evolutionary potential of temperate plant and animal species.Species can experience heterogeneous evolutionary histories over their geographic range.Multidisciplinary approaches should therefore be preferentially chosen in prospective studies, the better to understand the impact of climatic change on past and present biodiversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UMR CNRS/uB 5561 Biogéosciences-Dijon, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, France. Christelle.Tougard@univ-montp2.fr

ABSTRACT
Elucidating the colonization processes associated with Quaternary climatic cycles is important in order to understand the distribution of biodiversity and the evolutionary potential of temperate plant and animal species. In Europe, general evolutionary scenarios have been defined from genetic evidence. Recently, these scenarios have been challenged with genetic as well as fossil data. The origins of the modern distributions of most temperate plant and animal species could predate the Last Glacial Maximum. The glacial survival of such populations may have occurred in either southern (Mediterranean regions) and/or northern (Carpathians) refugia. Here, a phylogeographic analysis of a widespread European small mammal (Microtus arvalis) is conducted with a multidisciplinary approach. Genetic, fossil and ecological traits are used to assess the evolutionary history of this vole. Regardless of whether the European distribution of the five previously identified evolutionary lineages is corroborated, this combined analysis brings to light several colonization processes of M. arvalis. The species' dispersal was relatively gradual with glacial survival in small favourable habitats in Western Europe (from Germany to Spain) while in the rest of Europe, because of periglacial conditions, dispersal was less regular with bottleneck events followed by postglacial expansions. Our study demonstrates that the evolutionary history of European temperate small mammals is indeed much more complex than previously suggested. Species can experience heterogeneous evolutionary histories over their geographic range. Multidisciplinary approaches should therefore be preferentially chosen in prospective studies, the better to understand the impact of climatic change on past and present biodiversity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus