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Curling up with a story: an interview with Sean Carroll. Interview by Jane Gitschier.

Carroll S - PLoS Genet. (2008)

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Following his initial work with fushi tarazu (ftz)—one of the segmentation genes in the Antennapedia complex of Drosophila—he has been instrumental in elaborating the developmental regulation and interaction of a variety of genes, at first in the developing embryo, and later in the genesis of leg and wing appendages... A chance encounter fueled his long-standing interest in evolution and prompted him to re-tool his lab for the study of butterfly wing development; comparison between the two species led to groundbreaking insights into the subtle evolutionary changes that can give rise to spectacularly different appearances... Carroll now leads a double life, and what captured my attention was his new-found voice as a writer about evolution, with three books already in print and, as I learned during the interview, two more ready for publication in 2009... The whole region, a few hundred kb, was cloned... Breakpoints of scr [sex-combs reduced] and ftz mutants were mapped... It's going to sound awkward, but from the moment we saw stripes, there was a lot of writing! I was talking about bristle patterns on the adult fruit fly, and Fred said “Do you think any of these genes you're studying could draw these kinds of patterns [on the butterfly wing]?” And that was the right question... We made cDNA libraries, developed tools for in situs of embryos, made antibodies... We posed very simply binary questions, and we got answers that were visual and that anyone could understand when they saw them... It was about 2 years of technical investment before we started to get cool results... In 1990, just as there was a sense of how periodic patterns were made in the embryo, I wrote a review for Cell about stripes... In the early 1920s Roy Chapman Andrews went across the Gobi dessert in search of ancient hominids—didn't find a one—but he went out in a fleet of Dodge cars with a camel caravan and this is the account of those expeditions... But instead, he found dinosaurs... So it's evolved... It's had its own little evolution.

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Sean Carroll.
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pgen-1000229-g001: Sean Carroll.

Mentions: Carroll (Image 1) is an expert in the field known as “evo devo,” an amalgam of developmental molecular biology as applied to the workings of animal evolution. Following his initial work with fushi tarazu (ftz)—one of the segmentation genes in the Antennapedia complex of Drosophila—he has been instrumental in elaborating the developmental regulation and interaction of a variety of genes, at first in the developing embryo, and later in the genesis of leg and wing appendages. A chance encounter fueled his long-standing interest in evolution and prompted him to re-tool his lab for the study of butterfly wing development; comparison between the two species led to groundbreaking insights into the subtle evolutionary changes that can give rise to spectacularly different appearances.


Curling up with a story: an interview with Sean Carroll. Interview by Jane Gitschier.

Carroll S - PLoS Genet. (2008)

Sean Carroll.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2570611&req=5

pgen-1000229-g001: Sean Carroll.
Mentions: Carroll (Image 1) is an expert in the field known as “evo devo,” an amalgam of developmental molecular biology as applied to the workings of animal evolution. Following his initial work with fushi tarazu (ftz)—one of the segmentation genes in the Antennapedia complex of Drosophila—he has been instrumental in elaborating the developmental regulation and interaction of a variety of genes, at first in the developing embryo, and later in the genesis of leg and wing appendages. A chance encounter fueled his long-standing interest in evolution and prompted him to re-tool his lab for the study of butterfly wing development; comparison between the two species led to groundbreaking insights into the subtle evolutionary changes that can give rise to spectacularly different appearances.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Following his initial work with fushi tarazu (ftz)—one of the segmentation genes in the Antennapedia complex of Drosophila—he has been instrumental in elaborating the developmental regulation and interaction of a variety of genes, at first in the developing embryo, and later in the genesis of leg and wing appendages... A chance encounter fueled his long-standing interest in evolution and prompted him to re-tool his lab for the study of butterfly wing development; comparison between the two species led to groundbreaking insights into the subtle evolutionary changes that can give rise to spectacularly different appearances... Carroll now leads a double life, and what captured my attention was his new-found voice as a writer about evolution, with three books already in print and, as I learned during the interview, two more ready for publication in 2009... The whole region, a few hundred kb, was cloned... Breakpoints of scr [sex-combs reduced] and ftz mutants were mapped... It's going to sound awkward, but from the moment we saw stripes, there was a lot of writing! I was talking about bristle patterns on the adult fruit fly, and Fred said “Do you think any of these genes you're studying could draw these kinds of patterns [on the butterfly wing]?” And that was the right question... We made cDNA libraries, developed tools for in situs of embryos, made antibodies... We posed very simply binary questions, and we got answers that were visual and that anyone could understand when they saw them... It was about 2 years of technical investment before we started to get cool results... In 1990, just as there was a sense of how periodic patterns were made in the embryo, I wrote a review for Cell about stripes... In the early 1920s Roy Chapman Andrews went across the Gobi dessert in search of ancient hominids—didn't find a one—but he went out in a fleet of Dodge cars with a camel caravan and this is the account of those expeditions... But instead, he found dinosaurs... So it's evolved... It's had its own little evolution.

Show MeSH