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Qing Zhong: scoring a slam dunk on the autophagy court.

Zhong Q - J. Cell Biol. (2008)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

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Whether he's chasing down a novel disease gene or making rebounds on the basketball court, Qing Zhong loves a spirited competition... He was trained as a physician in China, but soon found that his real passion was in biological research... Zhong calls the autophagy pathway “the next apoptosis”, because he believes that, like apoptosis, it will turn out to be central to human health and disease... So with a background like that, it's no wonder I wanted to be a doctor when I went to college. …I went to Peking Union Medical College... It's famous because it's one of the two medical schools in China that were founded by the Rockefeller Foundation, about 100 years ago... Most medical schools in China have five- or six-year programs, but this one has an eight-year program... I have to say I wasn't really a great medical student, but I found a new passion at the end of my program, when we had to do eight months of research training... In Wen-Hwa's laboratory I worked on Breast Cancer Gene 1 (BRCA1), which is mutated in more than half of all familial breast and ovarian cancers... We found that BRCA1 works together with the Rad50/Mre11/Nbs1 protein complex in DNA repair. …After working on BRCA1 for some time, I decided that instead of just studying one gene, I wanted to master a whole pathway, to ask, “What's the critical step? What are the important genes involved in this pathway?” I wanted to have the tools necessary for discovering novel genes, or novel pathways, so we could figure out how they contribute to human disease... I think the autophagy field now is where the apoptosis field was ten years ago... Can we use the drug to treat a human disease? I would love if I could be involved in something like that.

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Zhong sports the team jersey of his basketball idol, Yao Ming, who exhibits the kind of sporting competitiveness that Zhong admires.
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fig3: Zhong sports the team jersey of his basketball idol, Yao Ming, who exhibits the kind of sporting competitiveness that Zhong admires.


Qing Zhong: scoring a slam dunk on the autophagy court.

Zhong Q - J. Cell Biol. (2008)

Zhong sports the team jersey of his basketball idol, Yao Ming, who exhibits the kind of sporting competitiveness that Zhong admires.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2568013&req=5

fig3: Zhong sports the team jersey of his basketball idol, Yao Ming, who exhibits the kind of sporting competitiveness that Zhong admires.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Whether he's chasing down a novel disease gene or making rebounds on the basketball court, Qing Zhong loves a spirited competition... He was trained as a physician in China, but soon found that his real passion was in biological research... Zhong calls the autophagy pathway “the next apoptosis”, because he believes that, like apoptosis, it will turn out to be central to human health and disease... So with a background like that, it's no wonder I wanted to be a doctor when I went to college. …I went to Peking Union Medical College... It's famous because it's one of the two medical schools in China that were founded by the Rockefeller Foundation, about 100 years ago... Most medical schools in China have five- or six-year programs, but this one has an eight-year program... I have to say I wasn't really a great medical student, but I found a new passion at the end of my program, when we had to do eight months of research training... In Wen-Hwa's laboratory I worked on Breast Cancer Gene 1 (BRCA1), which is mutated in more than half of all familial breast and ovarian cancers... We found that BRCA1 works together with the Rad50/Mre11/Nbs1 protein complex in DNA repair. …After working on BRCA1 for some time, I decided that instead of just studying one gene, I wanted to master a whole pathway, to ask, “What's the critical step? What are the important genes involved in this pathway?” I wanted to have the tools necessary for discovering novel genes, or novel pathways, so we could figure out how they contribute to human disease... I think the autophagy field now is where the apoptosis field was ten years ago... Can we use the drug to treat a human disease? I would love if I could be involved in something like that.

Show MeSH