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Gossypiboma: a case report.

Aminian A - Cases J (2008)

Bottom Line: Gossypiboma, an infrequent surgical complication, is a mass lesion due to a retained surgical sponge surrounded by foreign-body reaction.Retained foreign body was diagnosed radiologically and confirmed with operation.Retained foreign body should be in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative patient who presents with pain, infection, or palpable mass.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. aliaminian@doctor.com.

ABSTRACT
Gossypiboma, an infrequent surgical complication, is a mass lesion due to a retained surgical sponge surrounded by foreign-body reaction. A 27-year-old lady presented with palpable abdominal mass five years after cesarean section. Retained foreign body was diagnosed radiologically and confirmed with operation. Retained foreign body should be in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative patient who presents with pain, infection, or palpable mass.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Abdominal CT scan showing a round well-defined soft-tissue mass containing an internal high-density area in the mid-abdomen.
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Figure 2: Abdominal CT scan showing a round well-defined soft-tissue mass containing an internal high-density area in the mid-abdomen.

Mentions: A 27-year-old lady presented with discomfort in periumbilical area since one month ago. The only positive point in her previous history was a cesarean section five years back. Vital signs were normal. On abdominal examination, a round mobile mass was palpable. All routine lab data were normal. Abdominal X-ray was in favor of retained sponge (figure 1). CT scan confirmed the diagnosis (figure 2). Exploratory laparotomy revealed an encapsulated sponge surrounded by omentum, which was removed (figure 3, 4). Postoperative course was uneventful.


Gossypiboma: a case report.

Aminian A - Cases J (2008)

Abdominal CT scan showing a round well-defined soft-tissue mass containing an internal high-density area in the mid-abdomen.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2567300&req=5

Figure 2: Abdominal CT scan showing a round well-defined soft-tissue mass containing an internal high-density area in the mid-abdomen.
Mentions: A 27-year-old lady presented with discomfort in periumbilical area since one month ago. The only positive point in her previous history was a cesarean section five years back. Vital signs were normal. On abdominal examination, a round mobile mass was palpable. All routine lab data were normal. Abdominal X-ray was in favor of retained sponge (figure 1). CT scan confirmed the diagnosis (figure 2). Exploratory laparotomy revealed an encapsulated sponge surrounded by omentum, which was removed (figure 3, 4). Postoperative course was uneventful.

Bottom Line: Gossypiboma, an infrequent surgical complication, is a mass lesion due to a retained surgical sponge surrounded by foreign-body reaction.Retained foreign body was diagnosed radiologically and confirmed with operation.Retained foreign body should be in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative patient who presents with pain, infection, or palpable mass.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. aliaminian@doctor.com.

ABSTRACT
Gossypiboma, an infrequent surgical complication, is a mass lesion due to a retained surgical sponge surrounded by foreign-body reaction. A 27-year-old lady presented with palpable abdominal mass five years after cesarean section. Retained foreign body was diagnosed radiologically and confirmed with operation. Retained foreign body should be in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative patient who presents with pain, infection, or palpable mass.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus