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Tooth wear: the view of the anthropologist.

Kaidonis JA - Clin Oral Investig (2007)

Bottom Line: In particular, differential wear between enamel and dentine was considered a physiological process relating to the evolution of the form and function of teeth.In particular, non-carious cervical lesions to date have not been observed within these populations and therefore should be viewed as 'modern-day' pathology.Extrapolating this anthropological perspective to the clinical setting has merits, particularly in the prevention of pre-mature unnecessary treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Dentistry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 5005, Australia. john.kaidonis@adelaide.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Anthropologists have for many years considered human tooth wear a normal physiological phenomenon where teeth, although worn, remain functional throughout life. Wear was considered pathological only if pulpal exposure or premature tooth loss occurred. In addition, adaptive changes to the stomatognathic system in response to wear have been reported including continual eruption, the widening of the masticatory cycle, remodelling of the temporomandibular joint and the shortening of the dental arches from tooth migration. Comparative studies of many different species have also documented these physiological processes supporting the idea of perpetual change over time. In particular, differential wear between enamel and dentine was considered a physiological process relating to the evolution of the form and function of teeth. Although evidence of attrition and abrasion has been known to exist among hunter-gatherer populations for many thousands of years, the prevalence of erosion in such early populations seems insignificant. In particular, non-carious cervical lesions to date have not been observed within these populations and therefore should be viewed as 'modern-day' pathology. Extrapolating this anthropological perspective to the clinical setting has merits, particularly in the prevention of pre-mature unnecessary treatment.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Showing an electron micrograph of a scratch in a tooth surface. If the depth of the initial scratch is measured (a), then re-measured on a subsequent appointment (b), the amount of tooth loss (c) over that time period and hence the current wear rate is determined
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Fig6: Showing an electron micrograph of a scratch in a tooth surface. If the depth of the initial scratch is measured (a), then re-measured on a subsequent appointment (b), the amount of tooth loss (c) over that time period and hence the current wear rate is determined

Mentions: For more precise quantification, a micro-impression of an initial scratch using either resin composite [20], where the negative is observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM), or simply a positive replica from a rubber impression, then observed under a SEM, will both produce very accurate results. During scanning, the depth of the scratch is determined at various points along the scratch, and a mean depth is obtained. Repeating the procedure of the same scratch on a subsequent appointment (a few days) will give the patient’s wear rate in microns (Fig. 6). This allows a prognostic assessment, which although still somewhat subjective, is still valuable in treatment planning decisions.Fig. 6


Tooth wear: the view of the anthropologist.

Kaidonis JA - Clin Oral Investig (2007)

Showing an electron micrograph of a scratch in a tooth surface. If the depth of the initial scratch is measured (a), then re-measured on a subsequent appointment (b), the amount of tooth loss (c) over that time period and hence the current wear rate is determined
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2563149&req=5

Fig6: Showing an electron micrograph of a scratch in a tooth surface. If the depth of the initial scratch is measured (a), then re-measured on a subsequent appointment (b), the amount of tooth loss (c) over that time period and hence the current wear rate is determined
Mentions: For more precise quantification, a micro-impression of an initial scratch using either resin composite [20], where the negative is observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM), or simply a positive replica from a rubber impression, then observed under a SEM, will both produce very accurate results. During scanning, the depth of the scratch is determined at various points along the scratch, and a mean depth is obtained. Repeating the procedure of the same scratch on a subsequent appointment (a few days) will give the patient’s wear rate in microns (Fig. 6). This allows a prognostic assessment, which although still somewhat subjective, is still valuable in treatment planning decisions.Fig. 6

Bottom Line: In particular, differential wear between enamel and dentine was considered a physiological process relating to the evolution of the form and function of teeth.In particular, non-carious cervical lesions to date have not been observed within these populations and therefore should be viewed as 'modern-day' pathology.Extrapolating this anthropological perspective to the clinical setting has merits, particularly in the prevention of pre-mature unnecessary treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Dentistry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 5005, Australia. john.kaidonis@adelaide.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Anthropologists have for many years considered human tooth wear a normal physiological phenomenon where teeth, although worn, remain functional throughout life. Wear was considered pathological only if pulpal exposure or premature tooth loss occurred. In addition, adaptive changes to the stomatognathic system in response to wear have been reported including continual eruption, the widening of the masticatory cycle, remodelling of the temporomandibular joint and the shortening of the dental arches from tooth migration. Comparative studies of many different species have also documented these physiological processes supporting the idea of perpetual change over time. In particular, differential wear between enamel and dentine was considered a physiological process relating to the evolution of the form and function of teeth. Although evidence of attrition and abrasion has been known to exist among hunter-gatherer populations for many thousands of years, the prevalence of erosion in such early populations seems insignificant. In particular, non-carious cervical lesions to date have not been observed within these populations and therefore should be viewed as 'modern-day' pathology. Extrapolating this anthropological perspective to the clinical setting has merits, particularly in the prevention of pre-mature unnecessary treatment.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus