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Tooth wear: the view of the anthropologist.

Kaidonis JA - Clin Oral Investig (2007)

Bottom Line: In particular, differential wear between enamel and dentine was considered a physiological process relating to the evolution of the form and function of teeth.In particular, non-carious cervical lesions to date have not been observed within these populations and therefore should be viewed as 'modern-day' pathology.Extrapolating this anthropological perspective to the clinical setting has merits, particularly in the prevention of pre-mature unnecessary treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Dentistry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 5005, Australia. john.kaidonis@adelaide.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Anthropologists have for many years considered human tooth wear a normal physiological phenomenon where teeth, although worn, remain functional throughout life. Wear was considered pathological only if pulpal exposure or premature tooth loss occurred. In addition, adaptive changes to the stomatognathic system in response to wear have been reported including continual eruption, the widening of the masticatory cycle, remodelling of the temporomandibular joint and the shortening of the dental arches from tooth migration. Comparative studies of many different species have also documented these physiological processes supporting the idea of perpetual change over time. In particular, differential wear between enamel and dentine was considered a physiological process relating to the evolution of the form and function of teeth. Although evidence of attrition and abrasion has been known to exist among hunter-gatherer populations for many thousands of years, the prevalence of erosion in such early populations seems insignificant. In particular, non-carious cervical lesions to date have not been observed within these populations and therefore should be viewed as 'modern-day' pathology. Extrapolating this anthropological perspective to the clinical setting has merits, particularly in the prevention of pre-mature unnecessary treatment.

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Shows a sheep’s tooth with scooped out dentine (d) and cementum (c) leaving ‘sickle’-shaped enamel blades (e) (shown in blue). The green arrow shows the movement direction of the blade system (dotted green line) from teeth in the opposing arch that causes scissorial point cutting where the blades contact
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Fig5: Shows a sheep’s tooth with scooped out dentine (d) and cementum (c) leaving ‘sickle’-shaped enamel blades (e) (shown in blue). The green arrow shows the movement direction of the blade system (dotted green line) from teeth in the opposing arch that causes scissorial point cutting where the blades contact

Mentions: The immediate scooping of the dentine and even cementum soon after exposure has been documented in many different species, in particular herbivores. For example, Fig. 5 shows the worn occlusal surface of a sheep’s tooth with scooped-out dentine and cementum. This ‘differential wear’ promotes the development of a sickle-shaped enamel pattern that is diametrically opposite between teeth in opposing arches. That is, the concavity of each sickle ‘blade’ faces towards the lingual on the lower teeth and towards the buccal on the uppers. The tooth form functions when the mandible moves with a wide, ‘lateral’ masticatory cycle to produce a shearing action made possible by a shallow glenoid fossa. That is, the opposing enamel blades move past one another to produce what is called ‘scissorial point cutting,’ which is a very efficient masticatory action [8, 10, 21]. This functional pattern was first demonstrated by Every [8] more than 50 years ago in many different species including herbivores, carnivores, primates and humans. Hence, the wider masticatory action seen among humans with progressing wear fits this paradigm.Fig. 5


Tooth wear: the view of the anthropologist.

Kaidonis JA - Clin Oral Investig (2007)

Shows a sheep’s tooth with scooped out dentine (d) and cementum (c) leaving ‘sickle’-shaped enamel blades (e) (shown in blue). The green arrow shows the movement direction of the blade system (dotted green line) from teeth in the opposing arch that causes scissorial point cutting where the blades contact
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2563149&req=5

Fig5: Shows a sheep’s tooth with scooped out dentine (d) and cementum (c) leaving ‘sickle’-shaped enamel blades (e) (shown in blue). The green arrow shows the movement direction of the blade system (dotted green line) from teeth in the opposing arch that causes scissorial point cutting where the blades contact
Mentions: The immediate scooping of the dentine and even cementum soon after exposure has been documented in many different species, in particular herbivores. For example, Fig. 5 shows the worn occlusal surface of a sheep’s tooth with scooped-out dentine and cementum. This ‘differential wear’ promotes the development of a sickle-shaped enamel pattern that is diametrically opposite between teeth in opposing arches. That is, the concavity of each sickle ‘blade’ faces towards the lingual on the lower teeth and towards the buccal on the uppers. The tooth form functions when the mandible moves with a wide, ‘lateral’ masticatory cycle to produce a shearing action made possible by a shallow glenoid fossa. That is, the opposing enamel blades move past one another to produce what is called ‘scissorial point cutting,’ which is a very efficient masticatory action [8, 10, 21]. This functional pattern was first demonstrated by Every [8] more than 50 years ago in many different species including herbivores, carnivores, primates and humans. Hence, the wider masticatory action seen among humans with progressing wear fits this paradigm.Fig. 5

Bottom Line: In particular, differential wear between enamel and dentine was considered a physiological process relating to the evolution of the form and function of teeth.In particular, non-carious cervical lesions to date have not been observed within these populations and therefore should be viewed as 'modern-day' pathology.Extrapolating this anthropological perspective to the clinical setting has merits, particularly in the prevention of pre-mature unnecessary treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Dentistry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 5005, Australia. john.kaidonis@adelaide.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Anthropologists have for many years considered human tooth wear a normal physiological phenomenon where teeth, although worn, remain functional throughout life. Wear was considered pathological only if pulpal exposure or premature tooth loss occurred. In addition, adaptive changes to the stomatognathic system in response to wear have been reported including continual eruption, the widening of the masticatory cycle, remodelling of the temporomandibular joint and the shortening of the dental arches from tooth migration. Comparative studies of many different species have also documented these physiological processes supporting the idea of perpetual change over time. In particular, differential wear between enamel and dentine was considered a physiological process relating to the evolution of the form and function of teeth. Although evidence of attrition and abrasion has been known to exist among hunter-gatherer populations for many thousands of years, the prevalence of erosion in such early populations seems insignificant. In particular, non-carious cervical lesions to date have not been observed within these populations and therefore should be viewed as 'modern-day' pathology. Extrapolating this anthropological perspective to the clinical setting has merits, particularly in the prevention of pre-mature unnecessary treatment.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus