Limits...
Sources and sinks of diversification and conservation priorities for the Mexican tropical dry forest.

Becerra JX, Venable DL - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: Results indicate that vast areas of the forest have historically functioned as diversity sinks, generating few or no extant Bursera lineages.Only a few areas have functioned as major engines of diversification.Long-term preservation of biodiversity may be promoted by incorporation of such knowledge in decision-making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosphere 2, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. becerra@ag.arizona.edu

ABSTRACT
Elucidating the geographical history of diversification is critical for inferring where future diversification may occur and thus could be a valuable aid in determining conservation priorities. However, it has been difficult to recognize areas with a higher likelihood of promoting diversification. We reconstructed centres of origin of lineages and identified areas in the Mexican tropical dry forest that have been important centres of diversification (sources) and areas where species are maintained but where diversification is less likely to occur (diversity sinks). We used a molecular phylogeny of the genus Bursera, a dominant member of the forest, along with information on current species distributions. Results indicate that vast areas of the forest have historically functioned as diversity sinks, generating few or no extant Bursera lineages. Only a few areas have functioned as major engines of diversification. Long-term preservation of biodiversity may be promoted by incorporation of such knowledge in decision-making.

Show MeSH
Time-calibrated molecular phylogeny and distribution of species of Bursera in the 11 sub-biogeographical areas.Asterisks indicate species that are found in the Cape region of the Baja California peninsula. These species were treated as if their distribution included the south of the state of Jalisco (see materials and methods).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2562985&req=5

pone-0003436-g002: Time-calibrated molecular phylogeny and distribution of species of Bursera in the 11 sub-biogeographical areas.Asterisks indicate species that are found in the Cape region of the Baja California peninsula. These species were treated as if their distribution included the south of the state of Jalisco (see materials and methods).

Mentions: The purpose of our investigation was to identify geographic areas of high diversification as a way to help make predictions about future diversification for the genus Bursera. For this, maps of current distribution were generated for each species using information from herbarium specimens [the Universidad Nacional Autonóma de Mexico Herbarium (MEXU), the Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional Herbarium (ENCB), and the herbarium of the Instituto de Ecología, Bajío, México Instituto de Ecología, A.C. (IEB), from the on-line biodiversity information of the Mexican Comisión para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad (CONABIO, www.conabio.gob.mx), and from visits to many sites in the last 16 years. Bursera's current distribution in Mexico was divided into 11 sub-areas according to biogeographic information published on the genus and well-known biogeographic areas for the Mexican vegetation [15], [17], [18] (Figs. 1and 2). The selected areas were: 1) the northwest region, 2) the western region, 3) the sub-humid forests of the Pacific coast, 4) the southwest region, 5) the eastern side of the Balsas basin, 6) the western side of the Balsas basin, 7) the tropical dry forests of Oaxaca (excluding the ones in the eastern side of the Balsas basin), 8) the Chiapas region, 9) the Atlantic coast, 10) the tropical dry forests at the southern tip of Baja California, and 11) the central high plateau.


Sources and sinks of diversification and conservation priorities for the Mexican tropical dry forest.

Becerra JX, Venable DL - PLoS ONE (2008)

Time-calibrated molecular phylogeny and distribution of species of Bursera in the 11 sub-biogeographical areas.Asterisks indicate species that are found in the Cape region of the Baja California peninsula. These species were treated as if their distribution included the south of the state of Jalisco (see materials and methods).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2562985&req=5

pone-0003436-g002: Time-calibrated molecular phylogeny and distribution of species of Bursera in the 11 sub-biogeographical areas.Asterisks indicate species that are found in the Cape region of the Baja California peninsula. These species were treated as if their distribution included the south of the state of Jalisco (see materials and methods).
Mentions: The purpose of our investigation was to identify geographic areas of high diversification as a way to help make predictions about future diversification for the genus Bursera. For this, maps of current distribution were generated for each species using information from herbarium specimens [the Universidad Nacional Autonóma de Mexico Herbarium (MEXU), the Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional Herbarium (ENCB), and the herbarium of the Instituto de Ecología, Bajío, México Instituto de Ecología, A.C. (IEB), from the on-line biodiversity information of the Mexican Comisión para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad (CONABIO, www.conabio.gob.mx), and from visits to many sites in the last 16 years. Bursera's current distribution in Mexico was divided into 11 sub-areas according to biogeographic information published on the genus and well-known biogeographic areas for the Mexican vegetation [15], [17], [18] (Figs. 1and 2). The selected areas were: 1) the northwest region, 2) the western region, 3) the sub-humid forests of the Pacific coast, 4) the southwest region, 5) the eastern side of the Balsas basin, 6) the western side of the Balsas basin, 7) the tropical dry forests of Oaxaca (excluding the ones in the eastern side of the Balsas basin), 8) the Chiapas region, 9) the Atlantic coast, 10) the tropical dry forests at the southern tip of Baja California, and 11) the central high plateau.

Bottom Line: Results indicate that vast areas of the forest have historically functioned as diversity sinks, generating few or no extant Bursera lineages.Only a few areas have functioned as major engines of diversification.Long-term preservation of biodiversity may be promoted by incorporation of such knowledge in decision-making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosphere 2, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. becerra@ag.arizona.edu

ABSTRACT
Elucidating the geographical history of diversification is critical for inferring where future diversification may occur and thus could be a valuable aid in determining conservation priorities. However, it has been difficult to recognize areas with a higher likelihood of promoting diversification. We reconstructed centres of origin of lineages and identified areas in the Mexican tropical dry forest that have been important centres of diversification (sources) and areas where species are maintained but where diversification is less likely to occur (diversity sinks). We used a molecular phylogeny of the genus Bursera, a dominant member of the forest, along with information on current species distributions. Results indicate that vast areas of the forest have historically functioned as diversity sinks, generating few or no extant Bursera lineages. Only a few areas have functioned as major engines of diversification. Long-term preservation of biodiversity may be promoted by incorporation of such knowledge in decision-making.

Show MeSH