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The effect of diet quality and wing morph on male and female reproductive investment in a nuptial feeding ground cricket.

Hall MD, Bussière LF, Brooks R - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: In this species, both males and females make significant contributions to the production of offspring, as males provide a nuptial gift by allowing females to chew on a modified tibial spur during copulation and feed directing on their haemolymph.Individuals also have two distinct wing morphs, a short-winged flightless morph and a long-winged morph that has the ability to disperse.We discuss the broader implications of these findings including the differences in how males and females balance current and future reproductive effort in nuptial feeding insects, the changing nature of sexual selection when diets vary, and how the life-history trade-offs associated with the ability to disperse are expected to differ among populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Evolution & Ecology Research Centre and School of Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. m.hall@student.unsw.edu.au

ABSTRACT
A common approach in the study of life-history trade-off evolution is to manipulate the nutrient content of diets during the life of an individual in order observe how the acquisition of resources influences the relationship between reproduction, lifespan and other life-history parameters such as dispersal. Here, we manipulate the quality of diet that replicate laboratory populations received as a thorough test of how diet quality influences the life-history trade-offs associated with reproductive investment in a nuptial feeding Australian ground cricket (Pteronemobius sp.). In this species, both males and females make significant contributions to the production of offspring, as males provide a nuptial gift by allowing females to chew on a modified tibial spur during copulation and feed directing on their haemolymph. Individuals also have two distinct wing morphs, a short-winged flightless morph and a long-winged morph that has the ability to disperse. By manipulating the quality of diet over seven generations, we found that the reproductive investment of males and females were affected differently by the diet quality treatment and wing morph of the individual. We discuss the broader implications of these findings including the differences in how males and females balance current and future reproductive effort in nuptial feeding insects, the changing nature of sexual selection when diets vary, and how the life-history trade-offs associated with the ability to disperse are expected to differ among populations.

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The effect of diet quality treatment and wing morph type on male reproductive investment.The means and standard errors for the diet treatment and wing morph factors are calculated based on the average values for each of the experimental populations.
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pone-0003437-g001: The effect of diet quality treatment and wing morph type on male reproductive investment.The means and standard errors for the diet treatment and wing morph factors are calculated based on the average values for each of the experimental populations.

Mentions: The results of the mixed model analyses of the effects of diet treatment and wing morph versus male reproductive investment are shown in Table 2, while the means are shown in Figure 1. Although it appears that males from the low quality diet treatments provided larger nuptial gifts (Figure 1A) on fewer occasions (Figure 1B), both the estimates of male reproductive investment did not vary significantly between the diet treatments. Male attractiveness and male lifespan, however, did vary between the two diet treatments. Males from the high quality diet populations were marginally more attractive (Figure 1C) and lived approximately 10 days longer (Figure 1D) than males from the low quality diet populations. Likewise, only the number of copulations and male attractiveness differed significantly between the two wing types. In general, micropterous individuals obtained a greater number of copulations and were more attractive than macropterous individuals. The type of wing morph, however, had no effect on the average nuptial gift size provided to females or on male longevity. For all traits measured, the treatment by wing morph interactions were not significant, indicating that the effect of wing morph on the number of copulations and male attractiveness was consistent across the experimental populations of both diet quality treatments.


The effect of diet quality and wing morph on male and female reproductive investment in a nuptial feeding ground cricket.

Hall MD, Bussière LF, Brooks R - PLoS ONE (2008)

The effect of diet quality treatment and wing morph type on male reproductive investment.The means and standard errors for the diet treatment and wing morph factors are calculated based on the average values for each of the experimental populations.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2562459&req=5

pone-0003437-g001: The effect of diet quality treatment and wing morph type on male reproductive investment.The means and standard errors for the diet treatment and wing morph factors are calculated based on the average values for each of the experimental populations.
Mentions: The results of the mixed model analyses of the effects of diet treatment and wing morph versus male reproductive investment are shown in Table 2, while the means are shown in Figure 1. Although it appears that males from the low quality diet treatments provided larger nuptial gifts (Figure 1A) on fewer occasions (Figure 1B), both the estimates of male reproductive investment did not vary significantly between the diet treatments. Male attractiveness and male lifespan, however, did vary between the two diet treatments. Males from the high quality diet populations were marginally more attractive (Figure 1C) and lived approximately 10 days longer (Figure 1D) than males from the low quality diet populations. Likewise, only the number of copulations and male attractiveness differed significantly between the two wing types. In general, micropterous individuals obtained a greater number of copulations and were more attractive than macropterous individuals. The type of wing morph, however, had no effect on the average nuptial gift size provided to females or on male longevity. For all traits measured, the treatment by wing morph interactions were not significant, indicating that the effect of wing morph on the number of copulations and male attractiveness was consistent across the experimental populations of both diet quality treatments.

Bottom Line: In this species, both males and females make significant contributions to the production of offspring, as males provide a nuptial gift by allowing females to chew on a modified tibial spur during copulation and feed directing on their haemolymph.Individuals also have two distinct wing morphs, a short-winged flightless morph and a long-winged morph that has the ability to disperse.We discuss the broader implications of these findings including the differences in how males and females balance current and future reproductive effort in nuptial feeding insects, the changing nature of sexual selection when diets vary, and how the life-history trade-offs associated with the ability to disperse are expected to differ among populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Evolution & Ecology Research Centre and School of Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. m.hall@student.unsw.edu.au

ABSTRACT
A common approach in the study of life-history trade-off evolution is to manipulate the nutrient content of diets during the life of an individual in order observe how the acquisition of resources influences the relationship between reproduction, lifespan and other life-history parameters such as dispersal. Here, we manipulate the quality of diet that replicate laboratory populations received as a thorough test of how diet quality influences the life-history trade-offs associated with reproductive investment in a nuptial feeding Australian ground cricket (Pteronemobius sp.). In this species, both males and females make significant contributions to the production of offspring, as males provide a nuptial gift by allowing females to chew on a modified tibial spur during copulation and feed directing on their haemolymph. Individuals also have two distinct wing morphs, a short-winged flightless morph and a long-winged morph that has the ability to disperse. By manipulating the quality of diet over seven generations, we found that the reproductive investment of males and females were affected differently by the diet quality treatment and wing morph of the individual. We discuss the broader implications of these findings including the differences in how males and females balance current and future reproductive effort in nuptial feeding insects, the changing nature of sexual selection when diets vary, and how the life-history trade-offs associated with the ability to disperse are expected to differ among populations.

Show MeSH