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In vivo talocrural and subtalar kinematics during nonweightbearing and weightbearing dorsiflexion-plantarflexion activities

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Shape matching of the talus and calcaneus.
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Figure 1: Shape matching of the talus and calcaneus.

Mentions: Seven healthy subjects with a mean age of 32 ± 7 years were enrolled. Nonweightbearing and weightbearing activities from dorsiflexion to plantarflexion were recorded with oblique lateral fluoroscopy at 7.5 frames/sec. Geometric bone models of the tibia/fibula, talus, and calcaneus were created from CT images of the subject. Anatomic coordinate systems were embedded in each bone model. Three dimensional kinematics of the subtalar, talocrural, and ankle joint complex were determined using 3D-2D model registration techniques (Figure 1) [1,2]. Bone models were projected onto the distortion-corrected fluoroscopic image, and three dimensional positions and orientations of the bones were determined by matching the silhouette of the bone models with the silhouette of the image.


In vivo talocrural and subtalar kinematics during nonweightbearing and weightbearing dorsiflexion-plantarflexion activities
Shape matching of the talus and calcaneus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2562114&req=5

Figure 1: Shape matching of the talus and calcaneus.
Mentions: Seven healthy subjects with a mean age of 32 ± 7 years were enrolled. Nonweightbearing and weightbearing activities from dorsiflexion to plantarflexion were recorded with oblique lateral fluoroscopy at 7.5 frames/sec. Geometric bone models of the tibia/fibula, talus, and calcaneus were created from CT images of the subject. Anatomic coordinate systems were embedded in each bone model. Three dimensional kinematics of the subtalar, talocrural, and ankle joint complex were determined using 3D-2D model registration techniques (Figure 1) [1,2]. Bone models were projected onto the distortion-corrected fluoroscopic image, and three dimensional positions and orientations of the bones were determined by matching the silhouette of the bone models with the silhouette of the image.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

No MeSH data available.