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Heel strike angle and foot angular velocity in the sagittal plane during running in different shoe conditions

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Runners change their running style, e.g. heel strike strategy, to adapt to different shoe conditions... In this study, alterations of heel strike angle (HSA) and plantarflexion velocity (PFV) in the sagittal plane due to wearing different shoe conditions was examined... HSA in the sagittal plane and average corresponding PFV during touch down were calculated... A one-way repeated measures ANOVA was performed for each parameter in order to compare effects of the three shoe conditions... Furthermore, intraindividual variability across all subjects and shoes was quantified by the coefficient of variation (COVØ)... For kinematic and kinetic parameters highly significant differences were found between shoe conditions (Figure 1)... Comparing progression of heel angle around touchdown ± 30 ms increased cushioning conditions (S2, S3) resulted in higher HSA (Figure 2)... HSA and PFV show an individual range from 15.3° to 36.1° and 377°/s to 664°/s between subjects and shoes... Low intraindividual variability of subjects was found for all shoe conditions (COVØHSA = 5.4%, COVØPFV = 5.6%)... No correlation was observed between HSA, PFV, and the kinetic impact parameters for individual subjects... Significant differences of HSA and PFV between shoes support the assumption that heel strike angle and plantarflexion velocity in the sagittal plane are used to adapt to different shoe conditions independent from impact parameters... Furthermore, due to small intraindividual variability, it seems that magnitude of HSA and PFV is a characteristic feature of individual running style.

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Means (SD) of kinematic and kinetic parameters for the three shoe conditions.
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Figure 1: Means (SD) of kinematic and kinetic parameters for the three shoe conditions.

Mentions: For kinematic and kinetic parameters highly significant differences were found between shoe conditions (Figure 1). Comparing progression of heel angle around touchdown ± 30 ms increased cushioning conditions (S2, S3) resulted in higher HSA (Figure 2).


Heel strike angle and foot angular velocity in the sagittal plane during running in different shoe conditions
Means (SD) of kinematic and kinetic parameters for the three shoe conditions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2562095&req=5

Figure 1: Means (SD) of kinematic and kinetic parameters for the three shoe conditions.
Mentions: For kinematic and kinetic parameters highly significant differences were found between shoe conditions (Figure 1). Comparing progression of heel angle around touchdown ± 30 ms increased cushioning conditions (S2, S3) resulted in higher HSA (Figure 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Runners change their running style, e.g. heel strike strategy, to adapt to different shoe conditions... In this study, alterations of heel strike angle (HSA) and plantarflexion velocity (PFV) in the sagittal plane due to wearing different shoe conditions was examined... HSA in the sagittal plane and average corresponding PFV during touch down were calculated... A one-way repeated measures ANOVA was performed for each parameter in order to compare effects of the three shoe conditions... Furthermore, intraindividual variability across all subjects and shoes was quantified by the coefficient of variation (COVØ)... For kinematic and kinetic parameters highly significant differences were found between shoe conditions (Figure 1)... Comparing progression of heel angle around touchdown ± 30 ms increased cushioning conditions (S2, S3) resulted in higher HSA (Figure 2)... HSA and PFV show an individual range from 15.3° to 36.1° and 377°/s to 664°/s between subjects and shoes... Low intraindividual variability of subjects was found for all shoe conditions (COVØHSA = 5.4%, COVØPFV = 5.6%)... No correlation was observed between HSA, PFV, and the kinetic impact parameters for individual subjects... Significant differences of HSA and PFV between shoes support the assumption that heel strike angle and plantarflexion velocity in the sagittal plane are used to adapt to different shoe conditions independent from impact parameters... Furthermore, due to small intraindividual variability, it seems that magnitude of HSA and PFV is a characteristic feature of individual running style.

No MeSH data available.