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Identification of target genes for a MYB-type anthocyanin regulator in Gerbera hybrida.

Laitinen RA, Ainasoja M, Broholm SK, Teeri TH, Elomaa P - J. Exp. Bot. (2008)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, in floral tissues enhanced pelargonidin production is detected.Microarray analysis using the gerbera 9K cDNA array revealed a highly predicted set of putative target genes for GMYB10 including new gene family members of both early and late biosynthetic genes of the flavonoid pathway.However, completely new candidate targets, such as a serine carboxypeptidase-like gene as well, as two new MYB domain factors, GMYB11 and GMYB12, whose exact function in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis is not clear yet, were also identified.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Biology, PO Box 27, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Genetic modification of the flavonoid pathway has been used to produce novel colours and colour patterns in ornamental plants as well as to modify the nutritional and pharmaceutical properties of food crops. It has been suggested that co-ordinate control of multiple steps of the pathway with the help of regulatory genes would lead to a more predictable control of metabolic flux. Regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis has been studied in a common ornamental plant, Gerbera hybrida (Asteraceae). An R2R3-type MYB factor, GMYB10, shares high sequence similarity and is phylogenetically grouped together with previously characterized regulators of anthocyanin pigmentation. Ectopic expression of GMYB10 leads to strongly enhanced accumulation of anthocyanin pigments as well as to an altered pigmentation pattern in transgenic gerbera plants. Anthocyanin analysis indicates that GMYB10 specifically induces cyanidin biosynthesis in undifferentiated callus and in vegetative tissues. Furthermore, in floral tissues enhanced pelargonidin production is detected. Microarray analysis using the gerbera 9K cDNA array revealed a highly predicted set of putative target genes for GMYB10 including new gene family members of both early and late biosynthetic genes of the flavonoid pathway. However, completely new candidate targets, such as a serine carboxypeptidase-like gene as well, as two new MYB domain factors, GMYB11 and GMYB12, whose exact function in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis is not clear yet, were also identified.

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Expression analysis of the two MYB domain factor encoding genes, GMYB11 and GMYB12 identified as up-regulated by GMYB10 overexpression. GMYB11 is specifically expressed in anthocyanin pigmented petal tissue (A) while GMYB12 shows more ubiquitous expression pattern in various tissues (B).
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fig4: Expression analysis of the two MYB domain factor encoding genes, GMYB11 and GMYB12 identified as up-regulated by GMYB10 overexpression. GMYB11 is specifically expressed in anthocyanin pigmented petal tissue (A) while GMYB12 shows more ubiquitous expression pattern in various tissues (B).

Mentions: Northern analysis of wild-type Terra Regina showed that GMYB11 is petal specific and not detected in other organs (Fig. 4). Its expression starts at stage 5 during petal development correlating with the accumulation of anthocyanin pigments and continues until stage 8 when petals are fully expanded and opening of the inflorescence occurs (see Supplementary Fig. S3 at JXB online). This pattern was also confirmed by our previous microarray analyses covering the gerbera petal development from stages 2 to 9 (Laitinen et al., 2007; data not shown). GMYB12 was more ubiquitously expressed. The highest expression of GMYB12 was detected in leaves and petioles as well as in all floral organs and especially in young developing inflorescences (Fig. 4). During petal development, its expression showed an opposite pattern to GMYB11 as it was most highly expressed at the early stages before visible anthocyanin accumulation (see Supplementary Fig. S3 at JXB online).


Identification of target genes for a MYB-type anthocyanin regulator in Gerbera hybrida.

Laitinen RA, Ainasoja M, Broholm SK, Teeri TH, Elomaa P - J. Exp. Bot. (2008)

Expression analysis of the two MYB domain factor encoding genes, GMYB11 and GMYB12 identified as up-regulated by GMYB10 overexpression. GMYB11 is specifically expressed in anthocyanin pigmented petal tissue (A) while GMYB12 shows more ubiquitous expression pattern in various tissues (B).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2561154&req=5

fig4: Expression analysis of the two MYB domain factor encoding genes, GMYB11 and GMYB12 identified as up-regulated by GMYB10 overexpression. GMYB11 is specifically expressed in anthocyanin pigmented petal tissue (A) while GMYB12 shows more ubiquitous expression pattern in various tissues (B).
Mentions: Northern analysis of wild-type Terra Regina showed that GMYB11 is petal specific and not detected in other organs (Fig. 4). Its expression starts at stage 5 during petal development correlating with the accumulation of anthocyanin pigments and continues until stage 8 when petals are fully expanded and opening of the inflorescence occurs (see Supplementary Fig. S3 at JXB online). This pattern was also confirmed by our previous microarray analyses covering the gerbera petal development from stages 2 to 9 (Laitinen et al., 2007; data not shown). GMYB12 was more ubiquitously expressed. The highest expression of GMYB12 was detected in leaves and petioles as well as in all floral organs and especially in young developing inflorescences (Fig. 4). During petal development, its expression showed an opposite pattern to GMYB11 as it was most highly expressed at the early stages before visible anthocyanin accumulation (see Supplementary Fig. S3 at JXB online).

Bottom Line: Furthermore, in floral tissues enhanced pelargonidin production is detected.Microarray analysis using the gerbera 9K cDNA array revealed a highly predicted set of putative target genes for GMYB10 including new gene family members of both early and late biosynthetic genes of the flavonoid pathway.However, completely new candidate targets, such as a serine carboxypeptidase-like gene as well, as two new MYB domain factors, GMYB11 and GMYB12, whose exact function in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis is not clear yet, were also identified.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Biology, PO Box 27, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Genetic modification of the flavonoid pathway has been used to produce novel colours and colour patterns in ornamental plants as well as to modify the nutritional and pharmaceutical properties of food crops. It has been suggested that co-ordinate control of multiple steps of the pathway with the help of regulatory genes would lead to a more predictable control of metabolic flux. Regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis has been studied in a common ornamental plant, Gerbera hybrida (Asteraceae). An R2R3-type MYB factor, GMYB10, shares high sequence similarity and is phylogenetically grouped together with previously characterized regulators of anthocyanin pigmentation. Ectopic expression of GMYB10 leads to strongly enhanced accumulation of anthocyanin pigments as well as to an altered pigmentation pattern in transgenic gerbera plants. Anthocyanin analysis indicates that GMYB10 specifically induces cyanidin biosynthesis in undifferentiated callus and in vegetative tissues. Furthermore, in floral tissues enhanced pelargonidin production is detected. Microarray analysis using the gerbera 9K cDNA array revealed a highly predicted set of putative target genes for GMYB10 including new gene family members of both early and late biosynthetic genes of the flavonoid pathway. However, completely new candidate targets, such as a serine carboxypeptidase-like gene as well, as two new MYB domain factors, GMYB11 and GMYB12, whose exact function in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis is not clear yet, were also identified.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus